nun


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nun 1

 (nŭn)
n.
A woman who belongs to a religious order or congregation devoted to active service or meditation, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

[Middle English, from Old English nunne and from Old French nonne, both from Late Latin nonna, feminine of nonnus, tutor, monk.]

nun 2

 (no͝on)
n.
The 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. See Table at alphabet.

[Mishnaic Hebrew nûn, of Phoenician origin; see nwn in Semitic roots.]

nun

(nʌn)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a female member of a religious order
2. (Breeds) (sometimes capital) a variety of domestic fancy pigeon usually having a black-and-white plumage with a ridged peak or cowl of short white feathers
[Old English nunne, from Church Latin nonna, from Late Latin: form of address used for an elderly woman]
ˈnunlike adj

nun

(nʊn)
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the 14th letter in the Hebrew alphabet (נ or, at the end of a word, ן), transliterated as n

nun1

(nʌn)

n.
a woman who is a member of a religious order, esp. one bound by vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English nunne < Medieval Latin nonna, feminine of nonnus monk]
nun′like`, adj.

nun2

(nun, nʊn)

n.
the 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet.
[1875–80; < Hebrew nūn literally, fish]

nun

- Derived from Latin nonna, the feminine of nonnus, "monk," originally a title given to an elderly person.
See also related terms for monk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nun - a woman religiousnun - a woman religious      
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Sister - (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a nun (and used as a form of address); "the Sisters taught her to love God"
2.nun - a buoy resembling a conenun - a buoy resembling a cone    
buoy - bright-colored; a float attached by rope to the seabed to mark channels in a harbor or underwater hazards
3.nun - the 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet
Hebraic alphabet, Hebrew alphabet, Hebrew script - a Semitic alphabet used since the 5th century BC for writing the Hebrew language (and later for writing Yiddish and Ladino)
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"

nun

noun sister, Bride of Christ He was taught by the Catholic nuns
Translations
رَاهِبَةٌراهِبَه
jeptiška
nonne
nunna
časna sestra
nunna
尼僧
수녀
moterų vienuolynasvienuolė
mūķene
mníška
nuna
nunna
แม่ชี
nữ tu sĩ

nun

[nʌn] Nmonja f, religiosa f
to become a nunhacerse monja, meterse (a) monja

nun

[ˈnʌn] nreligieuse f, sœur f
She's a nun → Elle est religieuse.

nun

nNonne f

nun

[nʌn] nsuora, monaca

nun

(nan) noun
a member of a female religious community.
ˈnunneryplural ˈnunneries noun
a house in which a group of nuns live; a convent.

nun

رَاهِبَةٌ jeptiška nonne Nonne μοναχή monja nunna nonne časna sestra suora 尼僧 수녀 non nonne zakonnica freira монахиня nunna แม่ชี rahibe nữ tu sĩ 修女

nun

n. monja, hermana religiosa.
References in classic literature ?
Don't use such dreadful expressions," replied Meg from the depths of the veil in which she had shrouded herself like a nun sick of the world.
She had discarded her hoopskirt and appeared not unlike a nun.
Or, to the unread, unsophisticated Protestant of the Middle American States, why does the passing mention of a White Friar or a White Nun, evoke such an eyeless statue in the soul?
Then Tom became Robin Hood again, and was allowed by the treacherous nun to bleed his strength away through his neglected wound.
The Venusberg of Piccadilly looked white as a nun with snow and moonlight, but the melancholy music of pleasure, and the sad daughters of joy, seemed not to heed the cold.
As another instance of these bitter fruits of conquest, and perhaps the strongest that can be quoted, we may mention, that the Princess Matilda, though a daughter of the King of Scotland, and afterwards both Queen of England, niece to Edgar Atheling, and mother to the Empress of Germany, the daughter, the wife, and the mother of monarchs, was obliged, during her early residence for education in England, to assume the veil of a nun, as the only means of escaping the licentious pursuit of the Norman nobles.
I am a nun from the Spinning Convent,[10] and my mother when she died left me this apple.
No, indeed," replied the servant; "they all preserve a marvellous silence on the road, for not a sound is to be heard among them except the poor lady's sighs and sobs, which make us pity her; and we feel sure that wherever it is she is going, it is against her will, and as far as one can judge from her dress she is a nun or, what is more likely, about to become one; and perhaps it is because taking the vows is not of her own free will, that she is so unhappy as she seems to be.
Consequently, observe what happens: the Duchesse de Langeais(see "History of the Thirteen") makes herself a nun for the lack of ten minutes' patience; Judge Popinot (see "Commission in Lunacy") puts off till the morrow the duty of examining the Marquis d'Espard; Charles Grandet (see "Eugenie Grandet") goes to Paris from Bordeaux instead of returning by Nantes; and such events are called chance or fatality
As he appeared in the doorway, the nun rose, gave a low cry, and stood staring.
She was a nun in the convent of the Benedictines of Templemar.
The day after the event, she decided on leaving Paris with a nun of her acquaintance; they are gone to seek a very strict convent in Italy or Spain.