nunnery


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nun·ner·y

 (nŭn′ə-rē)
n. pl. nun·ner·ies
A convent of nuns.

nunnery

(ˈnʌnərɪ)
n, pl -neries
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the convent or religious house of a community of nuns

nun•ner•y

(ˈnʌn ə ri)

n., pl. -ner•ies.
a convent for nuns.
[1225–75]

Nunnery

 a community of nuns; a convent, 1275.
Examples: nunnery of eyes, 1651; of lively black-ey’d vestals, 1715.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nunnery - the convent of a community of nunsnunnery - the convent of a community of nuns  
convent - a religious residence especially for nuns

nunnery

noun convent, house, abbey, monastery, cloister In monasteries and nunneries, prayers are being offered for him.
Quotations
"Get thee to a nunnery" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
Translations
دَيْر للراهِبات
klášter
nonnekloster
apácakolostorapácazárdazárda
nunnuklaustur
kadınlar manastırı

nunnery

[ˈnʌnərɪ] Nconvento m de monjas

nunnery

[ˈnʌnəri] ncouvent m

nunnery

n (old)(Nonnen)kloster nt

nunnery

[ˈnʌnərɪ] nconvento

nun

(nan) noun
a member of a female religious community.
ˈnunneryplural ˈnunneries noun
a house in which a group of nuns live; a convent.
References in classic literature ?
He can't get into mischief in that little nunnery over there, and Mrs.
And nuns came, also; and more again, and yet more; and built over against the mon- astery on the yon side of the vale, and added building to building, until mighty was that nunnery.
I shall take up my abode in a religious house near Lisle--a nunnery you would call it; there I shall be quiet and unmolested.
Let me burn Kirklees-Hall with fire, and all its nunnery.
That there is,” cried Benjamin; “now, in running down the coast of Spain and Portingall, you may see a nunnery stuck out on every headland, with more steeples and outriggers.
It was originally a nunnery, founded by Queen Bertha, but done away with by King Penda, the reactionary to Paganism after St.
She had many privations and sufferings to undergo at first, but her worth and her gentle disposition won influential friends for her, and she built up a wealthy and flourishing nunnery.
Thus it came that, on the morning of the fourth day, he called Little John to him, and told him that he could not shake the fever from him, and that he would go to his cousin, the prioress of the nunnery near Kirklees, in Yorkshire, who was a skillful leech, and he would have her open a vein in his arm and take a little blood from him, for the bettering of his health.
He pointed with a smile to a turreted nunnery, and his eyes narrowed and gleamed.
For this marriage to Casaubon is as good as going to a nunnery.
my money is at an end, and I could but get a dish of bran-porridge from the nunnery.
But I think that little Jane Scoupe at school in the nunnery at Carowe would dry her eyes and smile when she read it.