nursemaid


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nurse·maid

 (nûrs′mād′)
n.
A woman employed to take care of infants or young children.

nursemaid

(ˈnɜːsˌmeɪd) or

nurserymaid

n
a woman or girl employed to look after someone else's children. Often shortened to: nurse

nurse•maid

(ˈnɜrsˌmeɪd)

n.
a woman or girl employed to care for children, esp. in a household.
Also called nurs′er•y•maid`.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nursemaid - a woman who is the custodian of childrennursemaid - a woman who is the custodian of children
dry nurse - a nurse who cares for but does not suckle an infant
keeper - someone in charge of other people; "am I my brother's keeper?"
mammy - an offensive term for a Black nursemaid in the southern U.S.
amah, wet nurse, wetnurse, wet-nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone else
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

nursemaid

noun nanny, nurse, angel (informal) She worked as nursemaid to the family of a diplomat.
Translations
مُرَبِّيَة أطْفال
slečna k dětemvychovatelka
barnepige
gyermeklány
barnfóstra
vychovávateľka

nursemaid

(o.f.) [ˈnɜːsmeɪd] Nniñera f, aya f
to play nursemaid to sbhacer de niñera de algn

nursemaid

n (= nanny, hum: = servant) → Kindermädchen nt

nursemaid

[ˈnɜːsˌmeɪd] nbambinaia

nurse

(nəːs) noun
1. a person who looks after sick or injured people in hospital. She wants to be a nurse.
2. a person, usually a woman, who looks after small children. The children have gone out with their nurse.
verb
1. to look after sick or injured people, especially in a hospital. He was nursed back to health.
2. to give (a baby) milk from the breast.
3. to hold with care. She was nursing a kitten.
4. to have or encourage (feelings eg of anger or hope) in oneself.
ˈnurseryplural ˈnurseries noun
1. a room etc for young children.
2. a place where young plants are grown.
ˈnursing noun
the profession of a nurse who cares for the sick.
ˈnursemaid noun
a nurse who looks after small children.
ˈnurseryman noun
a person who runs, or works in, a nursery for plants.
nursery rhyme
a short, simple poem for children.
nursery school
a school for very young children.
ˈnursing-home noun
a small private hospital.
References in classic literature ?
They were a young woman and a little girl: the former, so far as one could judge by appearances, was a nursemaid, or possibly a nursery-governess, in attendance on the child, whose refined face, even more than her dress, distinguished her as of a higher class than her companion.
We had then a young woman-- a nursemaid who had stayed on and who was a good girl and clever; and SHE took the children altogether for the interval.
At this moment Theodosia, the nursemaid, approached the old lady with the General's children.
There were times when I could not but think less of the boy, seeing him rock convulsed over antics of Irene that have been known to every nursemaid since the year One.
That child is a wonderful nursemaid," remarked Margaret.
If he doesn't, and some nursemaid goes out walkin' or orf with a soldier, leavin' of the hinfant in the perambulator-- well, then I shouldn't be surprised if the census is one babby the less.
Their fears were allayed and Tarzan now found himself often in the role of nursemaid to a tiny anthropoid-- an avocation which he found by no means irksome, since Gazan was a never-failing fount of surprises and entertainment.
An elderly nursemaid and two children were standing in a corner of the enclosure, looking at a lean goat tethered to the grass.
The only persons who were near to her, in the position she now occupied, were a nursemaid and two little boys.
The half-caste woman who looked after him (she smoked opium, and pretended to keep a second-hand furniture shop by the square where the cheap cabs wait) told the missionaries that she was Kim's mother's sister; but his mother had been nursemaid in a Colonel's family and had married Kimball O'Hara, a young colour- sergeant of the Mavericks, an Irish regiment.
If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
The parks were full of children and nursemaids and joyful dogs that leaped and yelped and scratched up the brown earth with their paws.