nursemaid

(redirected from nursemaids)
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nurse·maid

 (nûrs′mād′)
n.
A woman employed to take care of infants or young children.

nursemaid

(ˈnɜːsˌmeɪd) or

nurserymaid

n
a woman or girl employed to look after someone else's children. Often shortened to: nurse

nurse•maid

(ˈnɜrsˌmeɪd)

n.
a woman or girl employed to care for children, esp. in a household.
Also called nurs′er•y•maid`.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nursemaid - a woman who is the custodian of childrennursemaid - a woman who is the custodian of children
dry nurse - a nurse who cares for but does not suckle an infant
keeper - someone in charge of other people; "am I my brother's keeper?"
mammy - an offensive term for a Black nursemaid in the southern U.S.
amah, wet nurse, wetnurse, wet-nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone else
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

nursemaid

noun nanny, nurse, angel (informal) She worked as nursemaid to the family of a diplomat.
Translations
مُرَبِّيَة أطْفال
slečna k dětemvychovatelka
barnepige
gyermeklány
barnfóstra
vychovávateľka

nursemaid

(o.f.) [ˈnɜːsmeɪd] Nniñera f, aya f
to play nursemaid to sbhacer de niñera de algn

nursemaid

n (= nanny, hum: = servant) → Kindermädchen nt

nursemaid

[ˈnɜːsˌmeɪd] nbambinaia

nurse

(nəːs) noun
1. a person who looks after sick or injured people in hospital. She wants to be a nurse.
2. a person, usually a woman, who looks after small children. The children have gone out with their nurse.
verb
1. to look after sick or injured people, especially in a hospital. He was nursed back to health.
2. to give (a baby) milk from the breast.
3. to hold with care. She was nursing a kitten.
4. to have or encourage (feelings eg of anger or hope) in oneself.
ˈnurseryplural ˈnurseries noun
1. a room etc for young children.
2. a place where young plants are grown.
ˈnursing noun
the profession of a nurse who cares for the sick.
ˈnursemaid noun
a nurse who looks after small children.
ˈnurseryman noun
a person who runs, or works in, a nursery for plants.
nursery rhyme
a short, simple poem for children.
nursery school
a school for very young children.
ˈnursing-home noun
a small private hospital.
References in classic literature ?
Pocket's two nursemaids were looking about them while the children played.
If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
She had always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their mistresses.
The parks were full of children and nursemaids and joyful dogs that leaped and yelped and scratched up the brown earth with their paws.
Among the other forlorn wanderers in the Parks, there appeared latterly a trim little figure in black (with the face protected from notice behind a crape veil), which was beginning to be familiar, day after day, to nursemaids and children, and to rouse curiosity among harmless solitaries meditating on benches, and idle vagabonds strolling over the grass.
Many were the colloquies into which Sam entered with grooms who were airing horses on roads, and nursemaids who were airing children in lanes; but nothing could Sam elicit from either the first-mentioned or the last, which bore the slightest reference to the object of his artfully-prosecuted inquiries.
We had then a young woman-- a nursemaid who had stayed on and who was a good girl and clever; and SHE took the children altogether for the interval.
The only persons who were near to her, in the position she now occupied, were a nursemaid and two little boys.
If he doesn't, and some nursemaid goes out walkin' or orf with a soldier, leavin' of the hinfant in the perambulator-- well, then I shouldn't be surprised if the census is one babby the less.
They were a young woman and a little girl: the former, so far as one could judge by appearances, was a nursemaid, or possibly a nursery-governess, in attendance on the child, whose refined face, even more than her dress, distinguished her as of a higher class than her companion.
At this moment Theodosia, the nursemaid, approached the old lady with the General's children.
The half-caste woman who looked after him (she smoked opium, and pretended to keep a second-hand furniture shop by the square where the cheap cabs wait) told the missionaries that she was Kim's mother's sister; but his mother had been nursemaid in a Colonel's family and had married Kimball O'Hara, a young colour- sergeant of the Mavericks, an Irish regiment.