nurture


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nur·ture

 (nûr′chər)
n.
1.
a. The action of raising or caring for offspring: the nurture of an infant.
b. Biology The sum of environmental influences and conditions acting on an organism, especially in contrast to heredity.
c. The fostering or overseeing of the development of something: the nurture of an idea.
2. Something that nourishes; sustenance: "The butterfly poked its tiny proboscis down into her hair, probing for nurture" (Barbara Kingsolver).
tr.v. nur·tured, nur·tur·ing, nur·tures
1.
a. To raise or educate (a child, for example).
b. To encourage or help develop; cultivate: "a small college town that had nurtured his intellectual and creative pursuits" (James S. Hirsch).
2. To provide sustenance for; nourish: the meadow that nurtures the cattle.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin nūtrītūra, act of suckling, from Latin nūtrītus, past participle of nūtrīre, to suckle; see (s)nāu- in Indo-European roots.]

nur′tur·er n.
Synonyms: nurture, cultivate, foster, nurse
These verbs mean to promote and sustain the growth and development of: nurturing hopes; cultivating tolerance; foster friendly relations; nursed the fledgling business.

nurture

(ˈnɜːtʃə)
n
1. the act or process of promoting the development, etc, of a child
2. something that nourishes
3. (Biology) biology the environmental factors that partly determine the structure of an organism. See also nature12
vb (tr)
4. to feed or support
5. to educate or train
[C14: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre to nourish]
ˈnurturable adj
ˈnurturer n

nur•ture

(ˈnɜr tʃər)

v. -tured, -tur•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to feed and protect or support and encourage.
2. to bring up; train; educate.
n.
3. upbringing; training; education.
4. development: the nurture of young artists.
5. something that nourishes; food.
[1300–50; (n.) Middle English norture < Middle French nour(ri)ture < Late Latin nūtrītūra a nourishing]
nur′tur•er, n.

nurture

- The verb was formed after the noun, which first referred (c. 1330) to a person's training or breeding. The word can be traced back to Latin nutritus, meaning "to nourish."
See also related terms for nourish.

nurture


Past participle: nurtured
Gerund: nurturing

Imperative
nurture
nurture
Present
I nurture
you nurture
he/she/it nurtures
we nurture
you nurture
they nurture
Preterite
I nurtured
you nurtured
he/she/it nurtured
we nurtured
you nurtured
they nurtured
Present Continuous
I am nurturing
you are nurturing
he/she/it is nurturing
we are nurturing
you are nurturing
they are nurturing
Present Perfect
I have nurtured
you have nurtured
he/she/it has nurtured
we have nurtured
you have nurtured
they have nurtured
Past Continuous
I was nurturing
you were nurturing
he/she/it was nurturing
we were nurturing
you were nurturing
they were nurturing
Past Perfect
I had nurtured
you had nurtured
he/she/it had nurtured
we had nurtured
you had nurtured
they had nurtured
Future
I will nurture
you will nurture
he/she/it will nurture
we will nurture
you will nurture
they will nurture
Future Perfect
I will have nurtured
you will have nurtured
he/she/it will have nurtured
we will have nurtured
you will have nurtured
they will have nurtured
Future Continuous
I will be nurturing
you will be nurturing
he/she/it will be nurturing
we will be nurturing
you will be nurturing
they will be nurturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been nurturing
you have been nurturing
he/she/it has been nurturing
we have been nurturing
you have been nurturing
they have been nurturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been nurturing
you will have been nurturing
he/she/it will have been nurturing
we will have been nurturing
you will have been nurturing
they will have been nurturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been nurturing
you had been nurturing
he/she/it had been nurturing
we had been nurturing
you had been nurturing
they had been nurturing
Conditional
I would nurture
you would nurture
he/she/it would nurture
we would nurture
you would nurture
they would nurture
Past Conditional
I would have nurtured
you would have nurtured
he/she/it would have nurtured
we would have nurtured
you would have nurtured
they would have nurtured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nurture - the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a childnurture - the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
upbringing - properties acquired during a person's formative years
2.nurture - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
acculturation, enculturation, socialisation, socialization - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
Verb1.nurture - help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
patronage, keep going, patronise, patronize, support - be a regular customer or client of; "We patronize this store"; "Our sponsor kept our art studio going for as long as he could"
encourage - inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
serve well, serve - promote, benefit, or be useful or beneficial to; "Art serves commerce"; "Their interests are served"; "The lake serves recreation"; "The President's wisdom has served the country well"
2.nurture - bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
fledge - feed, care for, and rear young birds for flight
cradle - bring up from infancy
foster - bring up under fosterage; of children
3.nurture - provide with nourishment; "We sustained ourselves on bread and water"; "This kind of food is not nourishing for young children"
cater, ply, provide, supply - give what is desired or needed, especially support, food or sustenance; "The hostess provided lunch for all the guests"
carry - be able to feed; "This land will carry ten cows to the acre"

nurture

verb
1. bring up, raise, look after, rear, care for, develop Parents want to know the best way to nurture and raise their children to adulthood.
bring up ignore, overlook, neglect, deprive, disregard
2. tend, grow, cultivate The modern conservatory is not an environment for nurturing plants.
3. encourage, support, sustain, cultivate Seema's interest in literature was nurtured by her parents.
noun
1. upbringing, training, education, instruction, rearing, development The human organism learns partly by nature, partly by nurture.

nurture

nounverb
To promote and sustain the development of:
Translations
تَنْشِئَه، تَرْبِيَه، عِنايَه، غِذاءيُغَذّي، يُرَبِّي، يُنْشِئ
chovatpéčepěstovatvýchovavychovávat
nærenæringopfostreopfostring
hoitokasvatusravinto
táplálás
fóstra, ala uppumönnun, uppfóstrun
audzēšanaaudzētaudzināšanaaudzināt
bakıp beslemebakıp beslemekbakıp büyütmebakıp büyütmek

nurture

[ˈnɜːtʃəʳ]
A. VT
1. (= bring up) → criar, educar
2. (= nourish) → nutrir, alimentar
B. N
1. (= bringing-up) → educación f, crianza f
nature or nurturenaturaleza o educación
2. (= nourishment) → nutrición f

nurture

[ˈnɜːrtʃər] vt
(= encourage) [+ person] → former; [+ talent] → encourager
[+ hopes, ambition] → nourrir; [+ dream] → caresser
He nurtured an ambition to become a diplomat → Il nourrissait l'ambition de devenir diplomate.
He nurtured a dream of becoming a world-famous conductor → Il caressait le rêve de devenir un chef d'orchestre mondialement célèbre.
They nurture a dream of a fairer society
BUT Ils rêvent d'une société plus juste.
(= raise) [+ child] → élever; [+ plant] → faire pousser

nurture

n (= nourishing)Hegen nt; (= upbringing)Erziehung f, → Bildung f
vt
sb’s talententwickeln; idea, ambitionshegen; to nurture somebody on something (lit, fig)jdn mit etw aufziehen
(fig: = train) → hegen und pflegen

nurture

[ˈnɜːtʃəʳ] vt (rear) → allevare con amore; (feed) → nutrire

nurture

(ˈnəːtʃə) verb
to encourage the growth and development of (a child, plant etc).
noun
care; help in growing or developing.

nurture

vt nutrir, criar, apoyar
References in classic literature ?
She saw the children of the settlement on the grassy margin of the street, or at the domestic thresholds, disporting themselves in such grim fashions as the Puritanic nurture would permit
I'm not going to nurture her in luxury and idleness after Linton is gone.
Thus I made the second discovery on that first occasion, that the nurture of the little Pockets consisted of alternately tumbling up and lying down.
A weaver who finds hard words in his hymn-book knows nothing of abstractions; as the little child knows nothing of parental love, but only knows one face and one lap towards which it stretches its arms for refuge and nurture.
I have no provisions here which even a dog would share with me, and a horse of any tenderness of nurture would despise my couch pass therefore on thy way, and God speed thee.
No man should bring children into the world who is unwilling to persevere to the end in their nurture and education.
There be qualities in the youth, which may make him valiant to fight, and sober to toil, and pious to pray; and in the maiden, that may fit her to become a mother in our Israel, bringing up babes in better nurture than her own hath been.
In some countries we know the tree that sheds its leaf is the variety, but that does not make it less amazing that the same soil and the same sun should nurture plants differing in the first rule and law of their existence.
I exhorted her to seek consolation in doing her duty to God and man, to put her trust in Heaven, and solace herself with the care and nurture of her little daughter; assuring her she would be amply rewarded by witnessing its progress in strength and wisdom, and receiving its genuine affection.
They will not repay their aged parents the cost their nurture, for might shall be their right: and one man will sack another's city.
Such, then, are our principles of nurture and education: Where would be the use of going into further details about the dances of our citizens, or about their hunting and coursing, their gymnastic and equestrian contests?
As Mr Swiveller was decidedly favourable to these performances, upon the ground that looking at a Punch, or indeed looking at anything out of window, was better than working; and as he had been, for this reason, at some pains to awaken in his fellow clerk a sense of their beauties and manifold deserts; both he and Miss Sally rose as with one accord and took up their positions at the window: upon the sill whereof, as in a post of honour, sundry young ladies and gentlemen who were employed in the dry nurture of babies, and who made a point of being present, with their young charges, on such occasions, had already established themselves as comfortably as the circumstances would allow.