oar


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oar

 (ôr)
n.
1. A long, thin pole with a blade at one end, inserted into an oarlock and used to row or steer a boat.
2. A person who rows a boat, especially in a race.
v. oared, oar·ing, oars
v.tr.
1. To propel with or as if with oars or an oar.
2. To traverse with or as if with oars or an oar: an hour to oar the strait.
v.intr.
To move forward by or as if by rowing: oared strongly across the finish line.

[Middle English or, from Old English ār.]

oared adj.
oar′less adj.

oar

(ɔː)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a long shaft of wood for propelling a boat by rowing, having a broad blade that is dipped into and pulled against the water. Oars were also used for steering certain kinds of ancient sailing boats
2. (Rowing) short for oarsman
3. put one's oar in to interfere or interrupt
vb
to row or propel with or as if with oars: the two men were oaring their way across the lake.
[Old English ār, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse ār]
ˈoarless adj
ˈoarˌlike adj

oar

(ɔr, oʊr)
n.
1. a long shaft with a broad blade at one end, used as a lever for rowing or otherwise propelling or steering a boat.
v.t.
3. to propel with or as if with oars; row.
v.i.
4. to row.
[before 900; Middle English ore, Old English ār, c. Old Norse ār]

oar


Past participle: oared
Gerund: oaring

Imperative
oar
oar
Present
I oar
you oar
he/she/it oars
we oar
you oar
they oar
Preterite
I oared
you oared
he/she/it oared
we oared
you oared
they oared
Present Continuous
I am oaring
you are oaring
he/she/it is oaring
we are oaring
you are oaring
they are oaring
Present Perfect
I have oared
you have oared
he/she/it has oared
we have oared
you have oared
they have oared
Past Continuous
I was oaring
you were oaring
he/she/it was oaring
we were oaring
you were oaring
they were oaring
Past Perfect
I had oared
you had oared
he/she/it had oared
we had oared
you had oared
they had oared
Future
I will oar
you will oar
he/she/it will oar
we will oar
you will oar
they will oar
Future Perfect
I will have oared
you will have oared
he/she/it will have oared
we will have oared
you will have oared
they will have oared
Future Continuous
I will be oaring
you will be oaring
he/she/it will be oaring
we will be oaring
you will be oaring
they will be oaring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been oaring
you have been oaring
he/she/it has been oaring
we have been oaring
you have been oaring
they have been oaring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been oaring
you will have been oaring
he/she/it will have been oaring
we will have been oaring
you will have been oaring
they will have been oaring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been oaring
you had been oaring
he/she/it had been oaring
we had been oaring
you had been oaring
they had been oaring
Conditional
I would oar
you would oar
he/she/it would oar
we would oar
you would oar
they would oar
Past Conditional
I would have oared
you would have oared
he/she/it would have oared
we would have oared
you would have oared
they would have oared
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oar - an implement used to propel or steer a boatoar - an implement used to propel or steer a boat
vane, blade - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
implement - instrumentation (a piece of equipment or tool) used to effect an end
boat paddle, paddle - a short light oar used without an oarlock to propel a canoe or small boat
scull - each of a pair of short oars that are used by a single oarsman
scull - a long oar that is mounted at the stern of a boat and moved left and right to propel the boat forward
sweep oar, sweep - a long oar used in an open boat

oar

noun
stick your oar in interfere, intervene, get involved, meddle, butt in, poke your nose in (informal), put your two cents in (U.S. slang) Keep out of this - nobody asked you to stick your oar in.
Translations
مِجْدَافٌمِجْذاف
veslo
åre
aer
airo
veslo
evezõevező
ár
オール
remus
irklas
airis
veslo
åra
ไม้พาย
mái chèo

oar

[ɔːʳ] N
1. (= paddle) → remo m
to ship the oarsdesarmar los remos
to lie or rest on one's oarsdejar de remar (fig) → descansar, dormir sobre sus laureles
to put or shove one's oar inentrometerse, meter las narices
2. (= person) → remero/a m/f
to be a good oarser buen remero, remar bien

oar

[ˈɔːr] naviron m, rame f
to put one's oar in, to shove one's oar in (fig)mettre son grain de sel

oar

n
Ruder nt, → Riemen m (spec); to pull at the oarssich in die Riemen legen; he always has to put or stick his oar in (fig inf)er muss (aber auch) immer mitmischen (inf); to rest on one’s oars (fig)langsamer treten (inf)
(= person)Ruderer m, → Ruderin f

oar

[ɔːʳ] nremo
to put or shove one's oar in (fig) (fam) → impicciarsi

oar

() noun
a long piece of wood with a flat end for rowing a boat.

oar

مِجْدَافٌ veslo åre Ruder κουπί remo airo rame veslo remo オール roeispaan åre wiosło remo весло åra ไม้พาย kürek mái chèo
References in classic literature ?
I'm not tired, but you may take an oar, if you like.
He had evidently already taken leave of the people over at the house, for he descended the steps and went to join Beaudelet, who was out there with an oar across his shoulder waiting for Robert.
Aye, aye, sir, cheerily cried little King-Post, sweeping round his great steering oar.
Pulling an oar in the Jeroboam's boat, was a man of a singular appearance, even in that wild whaling life where individual notabilities make up all totalities.
They shoved off, presently, Tom in command, Huck at the after oar and Joe at the forward.
And as for Uncle Silas, it ain't any use for him to put in his oar, I wouldn't believe him under oath
What the Admiralty was to me that day; what nonsense I made of our case in my mind, as I listened to it; how I saw 'DORA' engraved upon the blade of the silver oar which they lay upon the table, as the emblem of that high jurisdiction; and how I felt when Mr.
Eight o'clock had struck before I got into the air that was scented, not disagreeably, by the chips and shavings of the long-shore boatbuilders, and mast oar and block makers.
No one took notice of me, only the bow oar saying, "Is that you, Jim?
The queen, who often used to hear me talk of my sea-voyages, and took all occasions to divert me when I was melancholy, asked me whether I understood how to handle a sail or an oar, and whether a little exercise of rowing might not be convenient for my health?
This being done the sea will rise and cover the mountain, and on it thou wilt perceive the figure of a metal man seated in a boat, having an oar in each hand.
While all these events were occurring, I was labouring at the oar without any hope of freedom; at least I had no hope of obtaining it by ransom, for I was firmly resolved not to write to my father telling him of my misfortunes.