oats


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oat

 (ōt)
n.
1. often oats(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. Any of various grasses of the genus Avena, especially A. sativa, widely cultivated for their edible grains.
b. The grain of any of these plants, used as food and fodder.
2. A musical pipe made of an oat straw.

[Middle English ote, from Old English āte.]

sow 1

 (sō)
v. sowed, sown (sōn) or sowed, sow·ing, sows
v.tr.
1. To scatter (seed) over the ground for growing.
2. To scatter seed over (land, for example).
3. To strew something around or over (an area); distribute something over: "The yard was sown with cement sculpture" (Ashley Warlick).
4. To propagate; disseminate: sow rumors.
v.intr.
To scatter seed for growing.
Idiom:
sow (one's) oats/wild oats
To indulge in sexually promiscuous or dissolute behavior, especially as a young adult.

[Middle English sowen, from Old English sāwan; see sē- in Indo-European roots.]

sow′er n.

sow 2

 (sou)
n.
1.
a. An adult female pig, especially one that has had at least one litter.
b. The adult female of several other animals, such as the bear.
2.
a. A channel that conducts molten iron to the molds in a pig bed.
b. The mass of metal solidified in such a channel or mold.

[Middle English, from Old English sugu and Old English ; see sū- in Indo-European roots.]
Translations
oves
havrehavre-
kaura
zob
zab
hafrar
オート麦
귀리
avižos
auzas
ovos
oves
havregryn
ข้าวโอ๊ต
yến mạch

oats

[əʊts] NPLavena fsing
to be off one's oatsestar desganado, haber perdido el apetito
to get one's oats (Brit) → echarse polvos (con regularidad)
see also wild A1.2

oats

[ˈəʊts] navoine f
to sow one's wild oats → faire les quatre cents coups

oats

[ˈəʊts] nplavena

oats

(əuts) noun singular or plural
a type of cereal plant or its grain (seeds). a field of oats; Horses eat oats.

oats

شَوَفَانِ oves havre Haferflocken βρώμη copos de avena, hojuelas de avena kaura avoine zob avena オート麦 귀리 haver havre owies aveia овес havregryn ข้าวโอ๊ต yulaf yến mạch 燕麦
References in classic literature ?
Let the boys be boys, the longer the better, and let the young men sow their wild oats if they must.
Sup- pose this--suppose all of the wheat, the corn, the oats, the peas, the potatoes, were all by some mira- cle swept away.
Without looking to the right or left to notice the scene of rural wealth, on which he had so often gloated, he went straight to the stable, and with several hearty cuffs and kicks roused his steed most uncourteously from the comfortable quarters in which he was soundly sleeping, dreaming of mountains of corn and oats, and whole valleys of timothy and clover.
For the nonce, however, he proposed to sail about, and sow his wild oats in all four oceans.
I had of course long been used to a halter and a headstall, and to be led about in the fields and lanes quietly, but now I was to have a bit and bridle; my master gave me some oats as usual, and after a good deal of coaxing he got the bit into my mouth, and the bridle fixed, but it was a nasty thing
I rejoice that horses and steers have to be broken before they can be made the slaves of men, and that men themselves have some wild oats still left to sow before they become submissive members of society.
I can take down bars, I can distinguish oats from shoe-pegs, I can blaspheme a saddle-boil with the college-bred, and I know a few other things - not many; I have had no chance, I have always had to work; besides, I am of low birth and no family.
The ostler at a roadside public-house was holding a pail of water to refresh my horses, when a cart of very green oats, newly reaped, passed by, and he remarked, - 'Yon's frough Gimmerton, nah
Raveloe was not a place where moral censure was severe, but it was thought a weakness in the Squire that he had kept all his sons at home in idleness; and though some licence was to be allowed to young men whose fathers could afford it, people shook their heads at the courses of the second son, Dunstan, commonly called Dunsey Cass, whose taste for swopping and betting might turn out to be a sowing of something worse than wild oats.
There was yet a fertile strip of time wherein to sow my last handful of the wild oats of youth.
The land was divided by long rows of trees, not regularly planted, but naturally growing; there was great plenty of grass, and several fields of oats.
They eat up the chicken food, and steal the oats and bran, and make holes in the meal bags.