obeisance


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o·bei·sance

 (ō-bā′səns, ō-bē′-)
n.
1. A gesture or movement of the body, such as a curtsy, that expresses deference or homage.
2. An attitude of deference or homage.

[Middle English obeisaunce, from Old French obeissance, from obeissant, present participle of obeir, to obey; see obey.]

o·bei′sant adj.

obeisance

(əʊˈbeɪsəns; əʊˈbiː-)
n
1. an attitude of deference or homage
2. a gesture expressing obeisance
[C14: from Old French obéissant, present participle of obéir to obey]
oˈbeisant adj
oˈbeisantly adv

o•bei•sance

(oʊˈbeɪ səns, oʊˈbi-)

n.
1. a movement of the body, as a bow or curtsy, expressing deep respect or deferential courtesy.
2. deference; homage.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French]
o•bei′sant, adj.

obeisance

1. a gesture of respect, as a bow.
2. homage or an act of homage. — obeisant, adj.
See also: Allegiance

Obeisance

 of servants: company of servants—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obeisance - bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greetingobeisance - bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting
reverence - an act showing respect (especially a bow or curtsy)
motion, gesture - the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals
genuflection, genuflexion - the act of bending the knees in worship or reverence
kotow, kowtow - a former Chinese custom of touching the ground with the forehead as a sign of respect or submission
scrape, scraping - a deep bow with the foot drawn backwards (indicating excessive humility); "all that bowing and scraping did not impress him"
salaam - a deep bow; a Muslim form of salutation
2.obeisance - the act of obeyingobeisance - the act of obeying; dutiful or submissive behavior with respect to another person
submission, compliance - the act of submitting; usually surrendering power to another
truckling - the act of obeying meanly (especially obeying in a humble manner or for unworthy reasons)

obeisance

noun (Formal)
1. homage, respect, tribute, loyalty, devotion, fidelity, reverence, deference, faithfulness, fealty Everyone paid obeisance to the emperor.
2. bow, salaam, salutation, kowtow, genuflection, bob, bending of the knee, curtsy or curtsey He graciously accepted our obeisances.

obeisance

noun
1. An inclination of the head or body, as in greeting, consent, courtesy, submission, or worship:
2. Great respect or high public esteem accorded as a right or as due:
Translations

obeisance

ʊˈbeɪsəns] N (frm)
1. (= homage) → homenaje m
to do or make or pay obeisance totributar homenaje a
2. (= bow etc) → reverencia f; (= salutation) → saludo m

obeisance

n
(form: = homage, respect) → Ehrerbietung f, → Reverenz f (geh), → Huldigung f (liter); to make or pay obeisance (to somebody)(jdm) seine Huldigung darbringen, (jdm) huldigen
(obs, = deep bow) → Verbeugung f, → Verneigung f
References in classic literature ?
Now, Hepzibah had unconsciously flattered herself with the idea that there would be a gleam or halo, of some kind or other, about her person, which would insure an obeisance to her sterling gentility, or, at least, a tacit recognition of it.
Never was there a more beautiful example of how the majesty of age and wisdom may comport with the obeisance and respect enjoined upon it, as from a lower social rank, and inferior order of endowment, towards a higher.
We halted; the tower saluted, I responded; then we wheeled and rode side by side to the grand-stand and faced our king and queen, to whom we made obeisance.
Littimer, without being at all discomposed, signified by a slight obeisance, that anything that was most agreeable to us was most agreeable to him; and began again.
Prior Aymer, therefore, and his character, were well known to our Saxon serfs, who made their rude obeisance, and received his ``benedicite, mes filz," in return.
As soon as I had declared my errand I was conducted into the presence of the Caliph, to whom, after I had made my obeisance, I gave the letter and the king's gift, and when he had examined them he demanded of me whether the Prince of Serendib was really as rich and powerful as he claimed to be.
At length the damsel with the jug returned and they made an end of washing Don Quixote, and the one who carried the towels very deliberately wiped him and dried him; and all four together making him a profound obeisance and curtsey, they were about to go, when the duke, lest Don Quixote should see through the joke, called out to the one with the basin saying, "Come and wash me, and take care that there is water enough.
He fairly turned green with rage when he saw Sir Richard of the Lea and Robin Hood in the royal company, but made low obeisance to his master.
They took their hats off and made obeisance and many signs, which however, I could not understand any more than I could their spoken language.
This voice made every one bow before it, resembling in its effect the wind passing over a field of wheat, by its superior strength forcing every ear to yield obeisance.
Collins having been in waiting near the lodges, to make them his parting obeisance, was able to bring home the pleasing intelligence, of their appearing in very good health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after the melancholy scene so lately gone through at Rosings.
My good little people," said he, making a low obeisance to the grand nation, "not for all the world would I do an intentional injury to such brave fellows as you