objective correlative


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Related to objective correlative: Negative capability

objective correlative

n.
A situation or a sequence of events or objects that evokes a particular emotion in a reader or audience.

objec′tive correl′ative


n.
a situation or chain of events in a literary work that objectifies a particular emotion in such a way as to evoke that emotion in the reader.
[1919; term introduced by T.S. Eliot]
References in periodicals archive ?
Namely, Hoover has a special talent for the objective correlative.
Eliot's Objective Correlative Tradition or Individual Talent: Contributions to the History of a Topos.
The "Tricking and stopping" (11) of the geese portray their maneuvers to escape her marauding, but the geese are also an objective correlative for the girl herself: she has tricked everyone by stopping in her tracks.
Before considering the objective correlative directly, he also considers positivism as a contemporary influence.
What is unusual indeed is the objective correlative he comes up with to objectify the complete meaning of what is being conveyed.
In sum, the sequence delivers an almost objective correlative effect and, in all probability, a highly calculated one: by way of film's essential formal properties and strengths, Malick finally whips viewers back to the narrative of the O'Brien family and their now comparatively small, even petty, problems.
In this way, Nick becomes for Hemingway not just a casualty of the war, but a figure whose postwar trauma and healing also function as an objective correlative for the process of postwar reconstruction.
Another characteristic example may be appreciated in the admirable piece on a pair of shoes, unremarkable in themselves and completely banal, yet a crucial sign of the domestic interior's well being, a sort of objective correlative of happiness:
Eliot conceived Hamlet as an artistic failure, pointing at the inexplicable manner in which Hamlet is obsessed with his mother's behavior; and how in terms of an objective correlative, Gertrude is not only an inadequate object for the emotions generated in the play, but also unable to support them.
Thus, the first two articles (Andrzej Kopcewicz's "Poe's philosophy of composition" (1968), and Marta Sienicka's "William Carlos Williams and some younger poets" (1972)) focus on formal and aesthetic analysis, using the categories of the objective correlative, structural analogies between image and text (or similar correspondences between poetry and other arts), the spatial form, organic poetics, the image of dance/dancer, intertextual references, and projective verse.
Eliot came upon the objective correlative as a way to express symbolically and intellectually states of feeling--an aesthetic vehicle or "container" for emotion.
This could be taken as an objective correlative signifying the loneliness and desolation of modern urban life.
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