objectivism

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ob·jec·tiv·ism

 (ŏb-jĕk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy One of several doctrines holding that all reality is objective and external to the mind and that knowledge is reliably based on observed objects and events.
2.
a. An emphasis on objects rather than feelings or thoughts in literature or art.
b. Objectivism A school of modernist poetry emphasizing the poem itself as object, rather than focusing on its ostensible content.

ob·jec′tiv·ist n.
ob·jec′tiv·is′tic adj.

objectivism

(əbˈdʒɛktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. the tendency to stress what is objective
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the meta-ethical doctrine that there are certain moral truths that are independent of the attitudes of any individuals
b. the philosophical doctrine that reality is objective, and that sense data correspond with it
obˈjectivist n, adj
obˌjectivˈistic adj
obˌjectivˈistically adv

ob•jec•tiv•ism

(əbˈdʒɛk təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. a tendency to lay stress on the objective or external elements of cognition.
2. the tendency, as of a writer, to deal with things external to the mind rather than with thoughts or feelings.
3. a doctrine or philosophy emphasizing individualism and self-interest.
[1850–55]
ob•jec′tiv•ist, n., adj.

objectivism

1. any of various philosophical theories stressing the external or objective elements of cognition.
2. Ethics. any theory asserting that the moral good is objective and not influenced by human feelings. — objectivist, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
views and behavior that are not moved by the emotional content of an event, argument, or problem. Also objectivity.
See also: Attitudes
Translations
objectivisme

objectivism

[əbˈdʒektɪvɪzəm] Nobjetivismo m

objectivism

nObjektivismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
His achievement consists in explaining social change 'from the bottom up', and not objectivistically, like Durkheim, 'from the top down,' in terms of social facts and structures (Gilgenmann, 2010).
In this 1965 lecture Popper uses the example of the subjectivist interpretation of information theory to argue that information can be interpreted objectivistically.
Any alternative to this ordinal approach would require a claim to meet some devised standard of evidence showing some objectivistically defined degree of linkage.