oblate


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ob·late 1

 (ŏb′lāt′, ŏ-blāt′)
adj.
1. Having the shape of a spheroid generated by rotating an ellipse about its shorter axis.
2. Having an equatorial diameter greater than the distance between poles; compressed along or flattened at the poles: Planet Earth is an oblate solid.

[Probably New Latin oblātus : Latin ob-, toward; see ob- + Latin (prō)lātus; see prolate.]

ob′late′ly adv.
ob′late′ness n.

ob·late 2

 (ŏb′lāt′)
n.
1. A layperson dedicated to religious life, especially such a layperson who is affiliated with but not a member of a monastic order.
2. Oblate Roman Catholic Church A member of one of various religious communities whose members are bound by less stringent vows than those required of monastic orders.

[Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin, past participle of offerre, to offer; see offer.]

oblate

(ˈɒbleɪt)
adj
(Mathematics) having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameter: the earth is an oblate sphere. Compare prolate
[C18: from New Latin oblātus lengthened, from Latin ob- towards + lātus, past participle of ferre to bring]
ˈoblately adv

oblate

(ˈɒbleɪt)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life
[C19: from French oblat, from Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin offerre to offer]

ob•late1

(ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt)

adj.
flattened at the poles, as a spheroid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its shorter axis (opposed to prolate).
[1695–1705; < New Latin oblātus lengthened = Latin ob- ob- + (prō)lātus prolate]
ob′late•ly, adv.

ob•late2

(ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt)

n.
a person serving and living in a monastery but not under monastic rule or full monastic vows.
[1860–65; < Medieval Latin oblātus, Latin: offered, past participle of offerre to offer]

oblate

, prolate - Oblate means "flattened at the poles," and the opposite is prolate; the Earth is an oblate spheroid.
See also related terms for poles.

oblate

a person resident and serving in a monastery but not under vows; a lay religious worker.
See also: Catholicism

oblate

Describes a planetary shape in which the equatorial distance is greater than the distance between the poles. The Earth is an oblate planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblate - a lay person dedicated to religious work or the religious life
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
Adj.1.oblate - having the equatorial diameter greater than the polar diameter; being flattened at the poles
rounded - curving and somewhat round in shape rather than jagged; "low rounded hills"; "rounded shoulders"
prolate, watermelon-shaped - having the polar diameter greater than the equatorial diameter; "a prolate spheroid is generated by revolving an ellipse about its major axis"
Translations
oblate

oblate

1
adj (Math) → abgeplattet

oblate

2
n (Eccl) → Oblate m
References in periodicals archive ?
Eliseo 'Jun' Mercado, OMI, who has been writing about the life of his Oblate colleagues, said Fr.
Oblate and Anglican clergy were both guilty of deception, sabotage, and the planting of malicious rumours about each other's failings.
The book reveals aspects of Oblate perceptions of the HudsonAEs Bay Company, Oblates and the beginnings of residential education, and the categorization of Indigenous residents.
The Zenlens scleral lenses are available in diameters of 16mm and 17mm, prolate and oblate designs, and are accompanied by a 28 lens diagnostic set, B+L confirmed.
In particular, this study illuminates processes that shaped Oblate conceptions of sauvage and metis.
The more round and oblate "modem" tomatoes were not available until after the Civil War.
Actes du Premier Symposium consacre a l'histoire des missions oblates aupres des Premieres Nations / Proceedings of the First Symposium Dedicated to the History of the Oblate Missions to the First Nations, Ottawa, Universite Saint-Paul, 2015, 247 p.
25] investigated the flow past a thin oblate spheroid falling at terminal velocity in an infinite, viscous fluid.
In September, she was received into the SSJD as an oblate.
The policy of the Oblate Order is to transfer the missionary priests about every ten years, so in 1979 he went to Wabasca-Desmarais where he was lucky as there was a church in good repair and no building of a church was required, which relieved him of a lot of stress and hard work.
2, 1997, Ratzinger's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith declared Oblate Fr.
The Oblate congregation was founded in the 17th century by a wealthy scion of the French aristocracy, the now St.