oblation


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Related to oblation: ablation

ob·la·tion

 (ə-blā′shən, ō-blā′-)
n.
1. The act of offering something, such as worship or thanks, to a deity.
2. Oblation
a. The act of offering the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
b. Something offered, especially the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
3. A charitable offering or gift.

[Middle English oblacioun, from Old French oblacion, from Late Latin oblātiō, oblātiōn-, from Latin oblātus, past participle of offerre, to offer : ob-, ob- + lātus, brought; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·la′tion·al, ob′la·to′ry (ŏb′lə-tôr′ē) adj.

oblation

(ɒˈbleɪʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the offering of the bread and wine of the Eucharist to God
2. any offering made for religious or charitable purposes
[C15: from Church Latin oblātiō; see oblate2]
oblatory, obˈlational adj

ob•la•tion

(ɒˈbleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an offering made to a deity, esp. the offering of bread and wine in the celebration of the Eucharist.
2. the act of making such an offering.
3. any offering for religious or charitable uses.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin oblātiō=oblā-, suppletive s. of offerre to offer + -tiō -tion]
ob•la•to•ry (ˈɒb ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) ob•la′tion•al, adj.

oblation

- Something offered to God or a god, like a sacrifice or donation, can be called an oblation.
See also related terms for sacrifice.

oblation

1. a religious offering, either as charity or to God or a god.
2. the Eucharist, especially the offering of bread and wine to God.
See also: Christianity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblation - the act of contributing to the funds of a church or charity; "oblations for aid to the poor"
giving, gift - the act of giving
2.oblation - the act of offering the bread and wine of the EucharistOblation - the act of offering the bread and wine of the Eucharist
religious ceremony, religious ritual - a ceremony having religious meaning
Offertory - the part of the Eucharist when bread and wine are offered to God

oblation

noun
1. A presentation made to a deity as an act of worship:
2. A charitable deed:
Translations

oblation

ʊˈbleɪʃən] N (Rel) → oblación f; (= offering) → oblata f, ofrenda f

oblation

n (Eccl) → Opfergabe f, → Opfer nt
References in classic literature ?
The uninvited guests enveloped and permeated them, and upon the night air rose joyous cries, congratulations, laughter and unclassified noises born of McGary's oblations to the hymeneal scene.
They cause that in all the universe men purify and sanctify their hearts, and clothe themselves in their holiday garments to offer sacrifices and oblations to their ancestors.
University Avenue leads to Quezon Hall and Guillermo Tolentino's famous Oblation but further on, right before the Lagoon, is 'Three Women Sewing a Flag' to honor the women who sewed the Philippine flag used to declare Philippine independence from Spain on June 12, 1898.
This celebration will help us remember that growth in the Christian life must be anchored on the Mystery of the Cross, to the oblation of Christ in the Eucharistic Banquet and to the Mother of the Redeemer and Mother of the Redeemed, the Virgin who makes her offering to God," read the decree published by Vatican News in their website.
I actually had a UP Oblation Scholarship so it would have been a lot easier to just go to school here where the path was well laid out, but I knew I wanted to see how I'd perform out there competing in a different country and testing my limits.
We discern his light when it is refracted (or mediated) through the words and stories of Scripture, the simple acts of oblation and generosity in the community that is the Church, and through countless ways we give compassion and mercy toward each other.
The biggest sacrifice I have made is the oblation of myself as the solitary parivar-less Damodardas Modi by opting for the bigger Parivar.
If your faith is strong, you attend Mass because an unparalleled sacred action is unfolding in your presence the Sacrifice of Christ on the cross, the oblation of Christ that reconciled God and man and redeemed the world.
The heavy gauge, pure hand-hammered copper Oblation Bowl is made from 100 percent recycled sources, set off with repoussed studs.
Karen McCabe had radiofrequency oblation, a minimally invasive procedure at the Bons Secour Hospital in North Dublin on August 6, 2014.
The man holds in his hand a young deer as an oblation.
27) And she concluded her act of oblation with these words: "I want, oh my Dearly Beloved, to renew this oblation with every beating of my heart an infinite number of times, until, the shadows having disappeared, I can tell you my Love again in an Eternal Face to Face