obliged


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

o·blige

 (ə-blīj′)
v. o·bliged, o·blig·ing, o·blig·es
v.tr.
1. To compel or require (someone) to do something, as by circumstance or legality: When the power went out, we were obliged to fetch water with a bucket. The contract obliges you to meet the deadline.
2. To make indebted or grateful: I am obliged to you for your gracious hospitality.
3. To do a service or favor for: They obliged us by arriving early.
v.intr.
To do a service or favor: The soloist obliged with yet another encore.

[Middle English obligen, from Old French obligier, from Latin obligāre : ob-, to; see ob- + ligāre, to bind; see leig- in Indo-European roots.]

o·blig′er n.
Synonyms: oblige, accommodate, favor
These verbs mean to perform a service or a courteous act for: She obliged me by keeping the personal matter quiet. My brother is accommodating me by lending me money. The singer favored the audience with an encore. See Also Synonyms at force.

obliged

(əˈblaɪdʒd)
adj
to feel obligated to dogratefulexpressions used when one wants to indicate that one is very grateful for somethingexpressions used to tell someone in a polite but firm way that one wants them to do somethingused as a polite convention for opening or closing a letter; literally, indebted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obliged - under a moral obligation to do something
obligated - caused by law or conscience to follow a certain course; "felt obligated to repay the kindness"; "was obligated to pay off the student loan"

obliged

adjective
1. forced, required, bound, compelled, obligated, duty-bound, under an obligation, under compulsion, without any option I was obliged to answer their questions.
2. grateful, in (someone's) debt, thankful, indebted, appreciative, beholden I am extremely obliged to you.
much obliged thank you, thanks, cheers (informal), thanks very much, thanks a lot, many thanks Much obliged for your assistance.

obliged

adjective
Owing something, such as gratitude or appreciation, to another:
Archaic: bounden.
Idiom: under obligation.
Translations

obliged

[əˈblaɪdʒd] adj
(= obligated) → obligé(e)
to feel obliged to do sth → se sentir obligé de faire qch
(= grateful) → reconnaissant(e)
to be obliged to sb for sth → savoir gré à qn de qch
I'm obliged to you for all the trouble you've taken → je vous sais gré de tout le mal que vous vous êtes donné.
I would be obliged if you could ... → je vous saurai gré de bien vouloir ...
I would be obliged if you could read it to us → Je vous saurai gré de bien vouloir nous le lire.
much obliged! → merci mille fois !
References in classic literature ?
I'm a great deal better for it, and ever so much obliged.
And Nature takes no account of moral consequences, of arbitrary conditions which we create, and which we feel obliged to maintain at any cost.
As they were also sure of foot, the Narragansetts were greatly sought for by females who were obliged to travel over the roots and holes in the "new countries.
They carried this expedition so secretly, that the unwary inhabitants did not discover them, until they fired upon the forts; and, not being prepared to oppose them, were obliged to surrender themselves miserable captives to barbarous savages, who immediately after tomahawked one man and two women, and loaded all the others with heavy baggage, forcing them along toward their towns, able or unable to march.
At present, however, he was obliged to confine himself to the functions of an elegant guide and cicerone--when not engaged in "having it out" with his horse.
But it is a strange experience, to a man of pride and sensibility, to know that his interests are within the control of individuals who neither love nor understand him, and by whom, since one or the other must needs happen, he would rather be injured than obliged.
The tale was told of old Brouwer, a most heretical disbeliever in ghosts, how he met the Horseman returning from his foray into Sleepy Hollow, and was obliged to get up behind him; how they galloped over bush and brake, over hill and swamp, until they reached the bridge; when the Horseman suddenly turned into a skeleton, threw old Brouwer into the brook, and sprang away over the tree-tops with a clap of thunder.
It was a pity to be obliged to reinvestigate the certitude of the moment itself and repeat how it had come to me as a revelation that the inconceivable communion I then surprised was a matter, for either party, of habit.
In short, like many inland reapers and mowers, who go into the farmers' meadows armed with their own scythes --though in no wise obliged to furnished them -- even so, Queequeg, for his own private reasons, preferred his own harpoon.
Some fifty years ago there was a curious case of whale-trover litigated in England, wherein the plaintiffs set forth that after a hard chase of a whale in the Northern seas; and when indeed they (the plaintiffs) had succeeded in harpooning the fish; they were at last, through peril of their lives, obliged to forsake not only their lines, but their boat itself.
I like to toss my head about and hold it as high as any horse; but fancy now yourself, if you tossed your head up high and were obliged to hold it there, and that for hours together, not able to move it at all, except with a jerk still higher, your neck aching till you did not know how to bear it.
Jurgis could take up a two-hundred-and-fifty-pound quarter of beef and carry it into a car without a stagger, or even a thought; and now he stood in a far corner, frightened as a hunted animal, and obliged to moisten his lips with his tongue each time before he could answer the congratulations of his friends.