oblivion


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o·bliv·i·on

 (ə-blĭv′ē-ən)
n.
1. The condition or quality of being completely forgotten: "He knows that everything he writes is consigned to posterity (oblivion's other, seemingly more benign, face)" (Joyce Carol Oates).
2. The act or an instance of forgetting; total forgetfulness: sought the great oblivion of sleep.
3. Archaic Official overlooking of offenses; amnesty.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin oblīviō, oblīviōn-, from oblīvīscī, to forget; see lei- in Indo-European roots.]

oblivion

(əˈblɪvɪən)
n
1. the condition of being forgotten or disregarded
2. the state of being mentally withdrawn or blank
3. (Law) law an intentional overlooking, esp of political offences; amnesty; pardon
[C14: via Old French from Latin oblīviō forgetfulness, from oblīviscī to forget]

ob•liv•i•on

(əˈblɪv i ən)

n.
1. the state of being completely forgotten.
2. the state of forgetting or of being oblivious: the oblivion of sleep.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin oblīviō=oblīv(īscī) to forget + -iō -ion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblivion - the state of being disregarded or forgotten
obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
2.oblivion - total forgetfulness; "he sought the great oblivion of sleep"
forgetfulness - unawareness caused by neglectful or heedless failure to remember; "his forgetfulness increased as he grew older"

oblivion

noun
1. unconsciousness, forgetfulness, senselessness, obliviousness, unawareness, insensibility, (waters of) Lethe He drank himself into oblivion.
unconsciousness perception, awareness, consciousness, sensibility
2. neglect, anonymity, insignificance, obscurity, limbo, nothingness, unimportance Most of these performers will fail and sink into oblivion.
3. extinction, annihilation, eradication, obliteration An entire section of the town was bombed into oblivion.

oblivion

noun
Freedom from worry, care, or unpleasantness:
Translations
oubliscotomisation

oblivion

[əˈblɪvɪən] Nolvido m
to cast into oblivionechar al olvido
to fall or sink into oblivioncaer en el olvido

oblivion

[əˈblɪviən] noubli m
to be consigned to oblivion (= forgotten about) → être relégué au passé, être relégué aux oubliettes
to consign sb to oblivion → condamner qn à l'oubli
to consign sth to oblivion → reléguer qch aux oubliettes

oblivion

n
Vergessenheit f, → Vergessen nt; to sink or fall into oblivionin Vergessenheit geraten, der Vergessenheit anheimfallen (geh); to rescue somebody/something from oblivionjdn/etw wieder ins Bewusstsein or ans Tageslicht bringen; he drank himself into oblivioner trank bis zur Bewusstlosigkeit; to be bombed/blasted into oblivion (town etc) → dem Erdboden gleichgemacht werden
(= unawareness) = obliviousness

oblivion

[əˈblɪvɪən] noblio
to fall or sink into oblivion → cadere nell'oblio
References in classic literature ?
It has been alienated from the Pyncheons these four-score years; but the Judge had kept it in his eye, and had set his heart on reannexing it to the small demesne still left around the Seven Gables; and now, during this odd fit of oblivion, the fatal hammer must have fallen, and transferred our ancient patrimony to some alien possessor.
They could remember him as he was in the freshness and strength of his young manhood, when he kissed his child and delivered it to its mother's hands and went away into that long oblivion.
It is falling now; it will still be falling when all these things shall have sunk down the afternoon of history, and the twilight of tradition, and been swallowed up in the thick night of oblivion.
Cobb's never active mind into complete oblivion as to his promise of keeping an eye on Rebecca.
such were the first sights, such were the first sounds, to which, after six weeks of oblivion, Magdalen suddenly and strangely awoke.
As I was saying; if Monsieur Manette had not died; if he had suddenly and silently disappeared; if he had been spirited away; if it had not been difficult to guess to what dreadful place, though no art could trace him; if he had an enemy in some compatriot who could exercise a privilege that I in my own time have known the boldest people afraid to speak of in a whisper, across the water there; for instance, the privilege of filling up blank forms for the consignment of any one to the oblivion of a prison for any length of time; if his wife had implored the king, the queen, the court, the clergy, for any tidings of him, and all quite in vain;--then the history of your father would have been the history of this unfortunate gentleman, the Doctor of Beauvais.
But the wet boots had at last suggested to Silas that the child had been walking on the snow, and this roused him from his entire oblivion of any ordinary means by which it could have entered or been brought into his house.
Often have I stood at the corner of Titchfield Street, and thought how De Quincey had stood there night after night waiting for her to come, but all in vain, and how from the abyss of oblivion into which some cruel chance had swept her, not one cry from her ever reached him again.
Farr off from these a slow and silent stream, LETHE the River of Oblivion roules Her watrie Labyrinth, whereof who drinks, Forthwith his former state and being forgets, Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain.
Now, however, no whit anticipating the oblivion which awaited their names and feats, the champions advanced through the lists, restraining their fiery steeds, and compelling them to move slowly, while, at the same time, they exhibited their paces, together with the grace and dexterity of the riders.
Don't tie yourself to it: it is fast wriggling into oblivion.
I know likewise, that writers of travels, like dictionary-makers, are sunk into oblivion by the weight and bulk of those who come last, and therefore lie uppermost.