obscure


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ob·scure

 (ŏb-skyo͝or′, əb-)
adj. ob·scur·er, ob·scur·est
1. Deficient in light; dark: the obscure depths of a cave.
2.
a. So faintly perceptible as to lack clear delineation; indistinct: an obscure figure in the fog.
b. Indistinctly heard; faint.
c. Linguistics Having the reduced, neutral sound represented by schwa (ə).
3.
a. Far from centers of human population: an obscure village.
b. Out of sight; hidden: an obscure retreat.
4. Not readily noticed or seen; inconspicuous: an obscure flaw.
5. Of undistinguished or humble station or reputation: an obscure poet; an obscure family.
6. Not clearly understood or expressed; ambiguous or vague: Some say that Blake's style is obscure and complex. See Synonyms at ambiguous.
tr.v. ob·scured, ob·scur·ing, ob·scures
1. To make dim, indistinct, or impossible to see: "His face was obscured in shadow" (Rosemary Mahoney). See Synonyms at block.
2. To make difficult to discern mentally or understand: The meaning of the text was obscured by its difficult language.
3. To diminish the stature of; overshadow or detract from: "[His] character was so repellent that it has obscured his historical role" (David Rains Wallace).
4. Linguistics To reduce (a vowel) to the neutral sound represented by schwa (ə).
n.
Something obscure or unknown.

[Middle English, from Old French obscur, from Latin obscūrus; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·scure′ly adv.
ob·scure′ness n.

obscure

(əbˈskjʊə)
adj
1. unclear or abstruse
2. indistinct, vague, or indefinite
3. inconspicuous or unimportant
4. hidden, secret, or remote
5. (Phonetics & Phonology) (of a vowel) reduced to or transformed into a neutral vowel (ə)
6. gloomy, dark, clouded, or dim
vb (tr)
7. to make unclear, vague, or hidden
8. to cover or cloud over
9. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics to pronounce (a vowel) with articulation that causes it to become a neutral sound represented by (ə)
n
a rare word for obscurity
[C14: via Old French from Latin obscūrus dark]
obscuration n
obˈscurely adv
obˈscureness n

ob•scure

(əbˈskyʊər)

adj. -scur•er, -scur•est, adj.
1. (of meaning) not clear or plain; ambiguous, vague, or uncertain.
2. not clear to the understanding; hard to perceive: obscure motives.
3. (of language, style, a speaker, etc.) not expressing the meaning clearly or plainly.
4. not readily seen, heard, etc.; indistinct; faint.
5. inconspicuous or unnoticeable: the obscure beginnings of a movement.
6. of little or no prominence or distinction; unknown: an obscure artist.
7. far from public notice or activity; remote: an obscure little town.
8. lacking in light or illumination; dark; dim; murky.
9. enveloped in or concealed by darkness.
10. (of a vowel) having the reduced or neutral sound usu. represented by the schwa (ə).
v.t.
11. to conceal or confuse (meaning, intention, or the like); cover; mask.
12. to make dark, dim, indistinct, etc.
13. to reduce or neutralize (a vowel) to the sound usu. represented by a schwa (ə).
n.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French oscur, obscur < Latin obscūrus dark]
ob•scure′ly, adv.
ob•scure′ness, n.
syn: See mysterious.

obscure


Past participle: obscured
Gerund: obscuring

Imperative
obscure
obscure
Present
I obscure
you obscure
he/she/it obscures
we obscure
you obscure
they obscure
Preterite
I obscured
you obscured
he/she/it obscured
we obscured
you obscured
they obscured
Present Continuous
I am obscuring
you are obscuring
he/she/it is obscuring
we are obscuring
you are obscuring
they are obscuring
Present Perfect
I have obscured
you have obscured
he/she/it has obscured
we have obscured
you have obscured
they have obscured
Past Continuous
I was obscuring
you were obscuring
he/she/it was obscuring
we were obscuring
you were obscuring
they were obscuring
Past Perfect
I had obscured
you had obscured
he/she/it had obscured
we had obscured
you had obscured
they had obscured
Future
I will obscure
you will obscure
he/she/it will obscure
we will obscure
you will obscure
they will obscure
Future Perfect
I will have obscured
you will have obscured
he/she/it will have obscured
we will have obscured
you will have obscured
they will have obscured
Future Continuous
I will be obscuring
you will be obscuring
he/she/it will be obscuring
we will be obscuring
you will be obscuring
they will be obscuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been obscuring
you have been obscuring
he/she/it has been obscuring
we have been obscuring
you have been obscuring
they have been obscuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been obscuring
you will have been obscuring
he/she/it will have been obscuring
we will have been obscuring
you will have been obscuring
they will have been obscuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been obscuring
you had been obscuring
he/she/it had been obscuring
we had been obscuring
you had been obscuring
they had been obscuring
Conditional
I would obscure
you would obscure
he/she/it would obscure
we would obscure
you would obscure
they would obscure
Past Conditional
I would have obscured
you would have obscured
he/she/it would have obscured
we would have obscured
you would have obscured
they would have obscured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.obscure - make less visible or unclearobscure - make less visible or unclear; "The stars are obscured by the clouds"; "the big elm tree obscures our view of the valley"
conceal, hide - prevent from being seen or discovered; "Muslim women hide their faces"; "hide the money"
overshadow - cast a shadow upon; "The tall tree overshadowed the house"
2.obscure - make unclear, indistinct, or blurred; "Her remarks confused the debate"; "Their words obnubilate their intentions"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
confuse, confound - mistake one thing for another; "you are confusing me with the other candidate"; "I mistook her for the secretary"
muddy - cause to become muddy; "These data would have muddied the prediction"
3.obscure - make obscure or unclear; "The distinction was obscured"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
4.obscure - reduce a vowel to a neutral one, such as a schwa
linguistics - the scientific study of language
reduce - destress and thus weaken a sound when pronouncing it
5.obscure - make undecipherable or imperceptible by obscuring or concealing; "a hidden message"; "a veiled threat"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
efface, obliterate - remove completely from recognition or memory; "efface the memory of the time in the camps"
mystify - make mysterious; "mystify the story"
Adj.1.obscure - not clearly understood or expressed; "an obscure turn of phrase"; "an impulse to go off and fight certain obscure battles of his own spirit"-Anatole Broyard; "their descriptions of human behavior become vague, dull, and unclear"- P.A.Sorokin; "vague...forms of speech...have so long passed for mysteries of science"- John Locke
unclear - not clear to the mind; "the law itself was unclear on that point"; "the reason for their actions is unclear to this day"
2.obscure - marked by difficulty of style or expression; "much that was dark is now quite clear to me"; "those who do not appreciate Kafka's work say his style is obscure"
uncomprehensible, incomprehensible - difficult to understand; "the most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible"- A. Einstein
3.obscure - difficult to find; "hidden valleys"; "a hidden cave"; "an obscure retreat"
concealed - hidden on any grounds for any motive; "a concealed weapon"; "a concealed compartment in his briefcase"
4.obscure - not famous or acclaimedobscure - not famous or acclaimed; "an obscure family"; "unsung heroes of the war"
inglorious - not bringing honor and glory; "some mute inglorious Milton here may rest"
5.obscure - not drawing attentionobscure - not drawing attention; "an unnoticeable cigarette burn on the carpet"; "an obscure flaw"
inconspicuous, invisible - not prominent or readily noticeable; "he pushed the string through an inconspicuous hole"; "the invisible man"
6.obscure - remote and separate physically or sociallyobscure - remote and separate physically or socially; "existed over the centuries as a world apart"; "preserved because they inhabited a place apart"- W.H.Hudson; "tiny isolated villages remote from centers of civilization"; "an obscure village"
unconnected - not joined or linked together

obscure

adjective
verb
1. obstruct, hinder, block out Trees obscured his vision.
2. hide, cover (up), screen, mask, disguise, conceal, veil, cloak, shroud, camouflage, envelop, encase, enshroud The building is almost completely obscured by a huge banner.
hide show, reveal, expose, unveil, uncover, unmask
3. obfuscate, confuse, cloud, blur, muddy, darken, muddy the waters of, adumbrate, befog, throw a veil over, bedim the jargon that frequently obscures legal documents
obfuscate explain, clarify, interpret, disclose, explicate

obscure

adjective
1. Deficient in brightness:
2. Not clearly perceived or perceptible:
3. Far from centers of human population:
4. Not readily noticed or seen:
Idiom: having a low profile.
5. Not known or not widely known by name:
6. Liable to more than one interpretation:
verb
1. To make dim or indistinct:
2. To conceal in obscurity:
3. To cut off from sight:
Translations
غَيْر مَشْهور، مَغْمورمُبْهَم، غامِضمُعْتِميَحْجُب
obskurskjuleuforståeligukendt
dimmur, óljóshylja, skyggja álítt òekkturtorráîinn
gožtimenkai žinomasnežinianežinomybėsunkiai įžiūrimas
aizēnotaizsegtaptumšotmazpazīstamsnesaprotams, miglains
málo známy
nejasenneznan
anlaşılması zorbelirsizgizlemekörtmektanınmamış

obscure

[əbˈskjʊəʳ]
A. ADJ
1. (= not well-known) [book, artist, poet] → poco conocido, oscuro; [village] → recóndito, perdido
some obscure disease we had never heard of beforeuna enfermedad poco conocida de la que nunca habíamos oído hablar antes
Norris himself has remained relatively obscureel mismo Norris sigue siendo hasta cierto punto un desconocido
2. (= not obvious) [word, jargon, terminology] → de difícil comprensión; [origins] → oscuro, poco claro
the meaning is obscureel significado es oscuro or poco claro
for some obscure reasonpor alguna extraña razón
to make obscure references to sthreferirse de forma críptica a algo
3. (= indistinct) [shape, figure] → borroso
B. VT
1. (= hide) [+ object, face, truth] → ocultar
some clouds obscured the sunalgunas nubes ocultaron el sol
the house is obscured by treesla casa está escondida detrás de unos árboles
my view was obscured by a lady in a large hatuna señora con un sombrero enorme no me dejaba ver
his article obscures the factssu artículo oscurece los hechos
this news should not be allowed to obscure the fact thatno se debería permitir que esta noticia impida ver claramente que ..., no se debería permitir que esta noticia vele el hecho de que ...
2. (= complicate) → complicar
it served only to obscure the matter furthersirvío para complicar aun más el asunto

obscure

[əbˈskjʊər]
adj
(= unknown) [person, thing] → obscur(e)
(= difficult) → obscur(e)
vt
[+ truth, facts] → obscurcir
[+ sun, area] → obscurcir

obscure

adj (+er)
(= hard to understand)dunkel; styleunklar, undurchsichtig; argumentverworren; language, word, book, poetschwer verständlich
(= indistinct) feeling, memorydunkel, undeutlich, unklar; for some obscure reasonaus einem unerfindlichen Grund
(= unknown, little known)obskur; poet, villageunbekannt; (= humble) beginningsunbedeutend; lifewenig beachtenswert; of obscure birthvon unbekannter Herkunft; he holds some obscure post in the Civil Serviceer hat so ein obskures Pöstchen im Staatsdienst
(rare, = dark) → düster, finster
vt
(= hide) sun, viewverdecken; the tree obscured the bay from our viewder Baum nahm uns (dat)die Sicht auf die Bucht
(= confuse)verworren or unklar machen; mindverwirren; truth, facts, issuesverschleiern

obscure

[əbˈskjʊəʳ]
1. adj (-r (comp) (-st (superl))) (gen) → oscuro/a; (feeling, memory) → vago/a
2. vt (darken) → oscurare; (hide, sun) → coprire; (issue, idea) → confondere

obscure

(əbˈskjuə) adjective
1. not clear; difficult to see. an obscure corner of the library.
2. not well-known. an obscure author.
3. difficult to understand. an obscure poem.
verb
to make obscure. A large tree obscured the view.
obˈscurely adverb
obˈscurity noun

obscure

a. oscuro-a; oculto-a, escondido-a.
References in classic literature ?
You won't see me, you'll be crying so hard that the thick fog round you will obscure the prospect.
Sympathetically set forth it would tap many strange, beautiful qualities in obscure men.
A dull, sickly yellow began to obscure the sky, and the water, from a beautiful blue, turned a slate color and ran along the sides of the vessel with a hissing sound as though the sullen waves would ask nothing better than to suck the craft down into their depths.
When Jim was still an obscure young lawyer, struggling to make his way in New York, his career was suddenly advanced by a brilliant marriage.
Monsieur Valmonde grew practical and wanted things well considered: that is, the girl's obscure origin.
The whites have assisted greatly in rendering the traditions of the Aborigines more obscure by their own manner of corrupting names.
To make sure, they each began to scrimmage; the broken-spirited Christie exhibiting both alacrity and penetration in searching obscure corners.
Matthew Maule, on the other hand, though an obscure man, was stubborn in the defence of what he considered his right; and, for several years, he succeeded in protecting the acre or two of earth which, with his own toil, he had hewn out of the primeval forest, to be his garden ground and homestead.
The founders of the greater part of the families which now compose the aristocracy of Salem might here be traced, from the petty and obscure beginnings of their traffic, at periods generally much posterior to the Revolution, upward to what their children look upon as long-established rank,
There were naturally things that in Flora's presence could pass between us only as prodigious and gratified looks, obscure and roundabout allusions.
Not only that, but the subtle insanity of Ahab respecting Moby Dick was noways more significantly manifested than in his superlative sense and shrewdness in foreseeing that, for the present, the hunt should in some way be stripped of that strange imaginative impiousness which naturally invested it; that the full terror of the voyage must be kept withdrawn into the obscure background (for few men's courage is proof against protracted meditation unrelieved by action); that when they stood their long night watches, his officers and men must have some nearer things to think of than Moby Dick.
He was not sure that he could manage the "sheeny," and he did not mean to take any chances with his district; let the Republicans nominate a certain obscure but amiable friend of Scully's, who was now setting tenpins in the cellar of an Ashland Avenue saloon, and he, Scully, would elect him with the "sheeny's" money, and the Republicans might have the glory, which was more than they would get otherwise.