obscurity

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ob·scu·ri·ty

 (ŏb-skyo͝or′ĭ-tē, əb-)
n. pl. ob·scu·ri·ties
1. Deficiency or absence of light; darkness.
2.
a. The quality or condition of being unknown: "Even utter obscurity need not be an obstacle to [political] success" (New Republic).
b. One that is unknown.
3.
a. The quality or condition of being imperfectly known or difficult to understand: "writings meant to be understood ... by all, composed without deliberate obscurity or hidden motives" (National Review).
b. An instance of being imperfectly known or difficult to understand.

obscurity

(əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being obscure
2. an obscure person or thing

ob•scu•ri•ty

(əbˈskyʊər ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being obscure.
2. a person or thing that is obscure.
[1470–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obscurity - the quality of being unclear or abstruse and hard to understandobscurity - the quality of being unclear or abstruse and hard to understand
incomprehensibility - the quality of being incomprehensible
clarity, clearness, limpidity, lucidity, lucidness, pellucidity - free from obscurity and easy to understand; the comprehensibility of clear expression
2.obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
standing - social or financial or professional status or reputation; "of equal standing"; "a member in good standing"
anonymity, namelessness - the state of being anonymous
humbleness, lowliness, obscureness, unimportance - the state of being humble and unimportant
nowhere - an insignificant place; "he came out of nowhere"
limbo, oblivion - the state of being disregarded or forgotten
prominence - the state of being prominent: widely known or eminent
3.obscurity - the state of being indistinct or indefinite for lack of adequate illumination
semidarkness - partial darkness

obscurity

noun
3. enigma, mystery, puzzle, problem, difficulty, complexity, riddle, conundrum Whatever its obscurities, the poem was clear on one count.
4. darkness, dark, shadows, shade, gloom, haze, blackness, murk, dimness, murkiness, haziness, duskiness, shadiness, shadowiness, indistinctness the vast branches vanished into deep indigo obscurity above my head

obscurity

noun
1. Absence or deficiency of light:
2. The quality or state of being obscure:
Translations
ظَلام، ظُلْمَه، غُموض
uklarhed
óskÿrleiki; torræîni
anlaşılmazlık

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ] N
1. (= the unknown) → oscuridad f
to live in obscurityvivir en la oscuridad
she rose from obscurity to be a leading name in fashionsalió de la nada para llegar a ser un nombre destacado del mundo de la moda
the band faded into obscurityel grupo cayó en el olvido
2. (= complexity) [of language, idea] → oscuridad f
obscurities (in a book) → puntos mpl oscuros
3. (liter) (= darkness) → oscuridad f

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərəti] n
[unknown person, thing] → obscurité f
[reply, statement] → caractère m obscur

obscurity

n
no pl (of a wood, night)Dunkelheit f, → Finsternis f, → Dunkel nt
(of style, ideas, argument)Unklarheit f, → Unverständlichkeit f, → Verworrenheit f; to lapse into obscurityverworren or unklar werden; he threw some light on the obscurities of the texter erhellte einige der unklaren Textstellen
no pl (of birth, origins)Dunkel nt; to live in obscurityzurückgezogen leben; to rise from obscurityaus dem Nichts auftauchen; in spite of the obscurity of his originstrotz seiner unbekannten Herkunft; to sink into obscurityin Vergessenheit geraten

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ] n (also) (fig) → oscurità f inv

obscure

(əbˈskjuə) adjective
1. not clear; difficult to see. an obscure corner of the library.
2. not well-known. an obscure author.
3. difficult to understand. an obscure poem.
verb
to make obscure. A large tree obscured the view.
obˈscurely adverb
obˈscurity noun
References in periodicals archive ?
3 : something that is difficult to understand <The poems are filled with obscurities.
Perhaps the chief curiosity of the Prologue is a passage that misattributes to the Latin grammarian Priscian, whose works served as standard textbooks in the medieval curriculum, the idea that ancient writers willfully contrived enigmatic texts so that later scholars would write commentaries clarifying their obscurities.
The new compilation features laves like "Big Boned Gal" and "Trail of Broken Hearts" alongside fun obscurities like "Friday Dance Promenade," "Hanky Panky," and "Pine and Stew.