obscurity


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Related to obscurity: Security through obscurity

ob·scu·ri·ty

 (ŏb-skyo͝or′ĭ-tē, əb-)
n. pl. ob·scu·ri·ties
1. Deficiency or absence of light; darkness.
2.
a. The quality or condition of being unknown: "Even utter obscurity need not be an obstacle to [political] success" (New Republic).
b. One that is unknown.
3.
a. The quality or condition of being imperfectly known or difficult to understand: "writings meant to be understood ... by all, composed without deliberate obscurity or hidden motives" (National Review).
b. An instance of being imperfectly known or difficult to understand.

obscurity

(əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being obscure
2. an obscure person or thing

ob•scu•ri•ty

(əbˈskyʊər ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being obscure.
2. a person or thing that is obscure.
[1470–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obscurity - the quality of being unclear or abstruse and hard to understandobscurity - the quality of being unclear or abstruse and hard to understand
incomprehensibility - the quality of being incomprehensible
clarity, clearness, limpidity, lucidity, lucidness, pellucidity - free from obscurity and easy to understand; the comprehensibility of clear expression
2.obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
standing - social or financial or professional status or reputation; "of equal standing"; "a member in good standing"
anonymity, namelessness - the state of being anonymous
humbleness, lowliness, obscureness, unimportance - the state of being humble and unimportant
nowhere - an insignificant place; "he came out of nowhere"
limbo, oblivion - the state of being disregarded or forgotten
prominence - the state of being prominent: widely known or eminent
3.obscurity - the state of being indistinct or indefinite for lack of adequate illumination
semidarkness - partial darkness

obscurity

noun
3. enigma, mystery, puzzle, problem, difficulty, complexity, riddle, conundrum Whatever its obscurities, the poem was clear on one count.
4. darkness, dark, shadows, shade, gloom, haze, blackness, murk, dimness, murkiness, haziness, duskiness, shadiness, shadowiness, indistinctness the vast branches vanished into deep indigo obscurity above my head

obscurity

noun
1. Absence or deficiency of light:
2. The quality or state of being obscure:
Translations
ظَلام، ظُلْمَه، غُموض
uklarhed
óskÿrleiki; torræîni
anlaşılmazlık

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ] N
1. (= the unknown) → oscuridad f
to live in obscurityvivir en la oscuridad
she rose from obscurity to be a leading name in fashionsalió de la nada para llegar a ser un nombre destacado del mundo de la moda
the band faded into obscurityel grupo cayó en el olvido
2. (= complexity) [of language, idea] → oscuridad f
obscurities (in a book) → puntos mpl oscuros
3. (liter) (= darkness) → oscuridad f

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərəti] n
[unknown person, thing] → obscurité f
[reply, statement] → caractère m obscur

obscurity

n
no pl (of a wood, night)Dunkelheit f, → Finsternis f, → Dunkel nt
(of style, ideas, argument)Unklarheit f, → Unverständlichkeit f, → Verworrenheit f; to lapse into obscurityverworren or unklar werden; he threw some light on the obscurities of the texter erhellte einige der unklaren Textstellen
no pl (of birth, origins)Dunkel nt; to live in obscurityzurückgezogen leben; to rise from obscurityaus dem Nichts auftauchen; in spite of the obscurity of his originstrotz seiner unbekannten Herkunft; to sink into obscurityin Vergessenheit geraten

obscurity

[əbˈskjʊərɪtɪ] n (also) (fig) → oscurità f inv

obscure

(əbˈskjuə) adjective
1. not clear; difficult to see. an obscure corner of the library.
2. not well-known. an obscure author.
3. difficult to understand. an obscure poem.
verb
to make obscure. A large tree obscured the view.
obˈscurely adverb
obˈscurity noun
References in classic literature ?
Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful.
And we view Kentucke situated on the fertile banks of the great Ohio, rising from obscurity to shine with splendor, equal to any other of the stars of the American hemisphere.
At last, after creeping, as it were, for such a length of time along the utmost verge of the opaque puddle of obscurity, they had taken that downright plunge which, sooner or later, is the destiny of all families, whether princely or plebeian.
There was one direction, assuredly, in which these discoveries stopped: deep obscurity continued to cover the region of the boy's conduct at school.
there is a deal of obscurity concerning the identity of the species thus multitudinously baptized.
It is enough to make a body ashamed of his race to think of the sort of froth that has always occupied its thrones without shadow of right or reason, and the seventh-rate people that have always figured as its aristocracies -- a company of monarchs and nobles who, as a rule, would have achieved only poverty and obscurity if left, like their betters, to their own exertions.
We were soon dressed and out of the house, watching the gradual approach of dawn, thoroughly absorbed in the first near view of the Oberland giants, which broke upon us unexpectedly after the intense obscurity of the evening before.
Pudd'nhead was still toiling in obscurity at the bottom of the ladder, under the blight of that unlucky remark which he had let fall twenty-three years before about the dog.
Men of family would not be very fond of connecting themselves with a girl of such obscurity and most prudent men would be afraid of the inconvenience and disgrace they might be involved in, when the mystery of her parentage came to be revealed.
Having completed her task, she rose to draw down the blind, which she had hitherto kept up, by way, I suppose, of making the most of daylight, though dusk was now fast deepening into total obscurity.
There was a great fire, and that was all the light in the huge apartment, whose floor had grown a uniform grey; and the once brilliant pewter-dishes, which used to attract my gaze when I was a girl, partook of a similar obscurity, created by tarnish and dust.
She knocked at the door immediately afterward, and glided into the obscurity of the room like a ghost.