obsequious


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ob·se·qui·ous

 (ŏb-sē′kwē-əs, əb-)
adj.
Full of or exhibiting servile compliance; fawning.

[Middle English, from Latin obsequiōsus, from obsequium, compliance, from obsequī, to comply : ob-, to; see ob- + sequī, to follow; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·se′qui·ous·ly adv.
ob·se′qui·ous·ness n.

obsequious

(əbˈsiːkwɪəs)
adj
1. obedient or attentive in an ingratiating or servile manner
2. rare submissive or compliant
[C15: from Latin obsequiōsus compliant, from obsequium compliance, from obsequi to follow, from ob- to + sequi to follow]
obˈsequiously adv
obˈsequiousness n

ob•se•qui•ous

(əbˈsi kwi əs)

adj.
characterized by or showing servile complaisance or deference; fawning; sycophantic: an obsequious bow; obsequious servants.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin obsequiōsus, derivative of obsequium compliance (obsequī to comply with =ob- ob- + sequī to follow)]
ob•se′qui•ous•ly, adv.
ob•se′qui•ous•ness, n.
syn: See servile.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obsequious - attempting to win favor from influential people by flattery
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
2.obsequious - attentive in an ingratiating or servile manner; "obsequious shop assistants"
servile - submissive or fawning in attitude or behavior; "spoke in a servile tone"; "the incurably servile housekeeper"; "servile tasks such as floor scrubbing and barn work"

obsequious

adjective servile, flattering, cringing, fawning, abject, submissive, grovelling, menial, subservient, ingratiating, deferential, sycophantic, slavish, unctuous, smarmy (Brit. informal), mealy-mouthed, toadying, bootlicking (informal), toadyish She is positively obsequious to anyone with a title.

obsequious

adjective
Excessively eager to serve or obey:
Translations
مُتَذَلِّل، مُتَزَلِّف
podlézavý
sleskunderdanigservil
auîmjúkur, fleîulegur
pataikaujamaiperdėtas nuolankumaspernelyg nuolankiaipernelyg nuolankus

obsequious

[əbˈsiːkwɪəs] ADJservil, sumiso

obsequious

[əbˈsiːkwiəs] adjobséquieux/euse

obsequious

adjunterwürfig, servil (geh)(to(wards) gegen, gegenüber)

obsequious

[əbˈsiːkwɪəs] adj (pej) → ossequioso/a

obsequious

(əbˈsiːkwiəs) adjective
too humble or too ready to agree with someone. He bowed in an obsequious manner.
obˈsequiously adverb
obˈsequiousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Baser still it regardeth the obsequious, doggish one, who immediately lieth on his back, the submissive one; and there is also wisdom that is submissive, and doggish, and pious, and obsequious.
History will teach us that the former has been found a much more certain road to the introduction of despotism than the latter, and that of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people; commencing demagogues, and ending tyrants.
Thus, each of the principal branches of the federal government will owe its existence more or less to the favor of the State governments, and must consequently feel a dependence, which is much more likely to beget a disposition too obsequious than too overbearing towards them.
Darcy exposed to all the parading and obsequious civility of her husband.
Lady Arabella stood a little on one side, and the African, accepting the movement as an invitation, entered in an obsequious way.
They crowd you-- infest you--swarm about you, and sweat and smell offensively, and look sneaking and mean, and obsequious.
His obsequious follower stood holding the torch above his head, and then the observer saw for the first time, from his place of concealment, that he was blind.
Cassy kept her room and bed, on pretext of illness, during the whole time they were on Red river; and was waited on, with obsequious devotion, by her attendant.
And there was Silver, sitting back almost out of the firelight, but eating heartily, prompt to spring forward when anything was wanted, even joining quietly in our laughter--the same bland, polite, obsequious seaman of the voyage out.
But a wise prince would rather choose to employ those who practise the last of these methods; because such zealots prove always the most obsequious and subservient to the will and passions of their master.
Yes, my Lady, change at Fayfield," were the next words I heard(oh that too obsequious Guard
with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.