obsolete


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ob·so·lete

 (ŏb′sə-lēt′, ŏb′sə-lēt′)
adj.
1. No longer in use: an obsolete word.
2. Outmoded in design, style, or construction: an obsolete locomotive.
3. Biology Vestigial or rudimentary, especially in comparison with related or ancestral species, as the tailbone of an ape. Used of an organ or other part of an organism.
tr.v. ob·so·let·ed, ob·so·let·ing, ob·so·letes
To cause to become obsolete: "The textbook publishers use every trick known to the marketing mind to obsolete their products year after year, thus closing off the possibility of second-hand sales" (Thomas Frank).

[Latin obsolētus, past participle of obsolēscere, to fall into disuse; see obsolescent.]

ob′so·lete′ly adv.
ob′so·lete′ness n.
ob′so·let′ism n.

obsolete

(ˈɒbsəˌliːt; ˌɒbsəˈliːt)
adj
1. out of use or practice; not current
2. out of date; unfashionable or outmoded
3. (Biology) biology (of parts, organs, etc) vestigial; rudimentary
[C16: from Latin obsolētus worn out, past participle of obsolēre (unattested), from ob- opposite to + solēre to be used]
ˈobsoˌletely adv
ˈobsoˌleteness n
Usage: The word obsoleteness is hardly ever used, obsolescence standing as the noun form for both obsolete and obsolescent

ob•so•lete

(ˌɒb səˈlit, ˈɒb səˌlit)

adj., v. -let•ed, -let•ing. adj.
1. no longer in general use: obsolete customs.
2. of a discarded or outmoded type: an obsolete battleship.
3. (of a linguistic form) no longer in use, esp., out of use for at least the past century: used in this dictionary to indicate that a word has not been in widespread use since c1750. Abbr.: Obs.
4. rudimentary in comparison with the corresponding part or trait in related species or in individuals of the opposite sex.
v.t.
5. to make obsolete; antiquate.
[1570–80; < Latin obsolētus, past participle of obsolēscere to fall into disuse, perhaps =ob- ob-sol(ēre) to be accustomed to + -ēscere -esce]
ob`so•lete′ly, adv.
ob`so•lete′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obsolete - no longer in use; "obsolete words"
noncurrent - not current or belonging to the present time

obsolete

adjective outdated, old, passé, ancient, antique, old-fashioned, dated, discarded, extinct, past it, out of date, archaic, disused, out of fashion, out, antiquated, anachronistic, outmoded, musty, old hat, behind the times, superannuated, antediluvian, outworn, démodé (French), out of the ark (informal), vieux jeu (French) The company says the plant is obsolete and does not merit further investment.
new, the new, current, modern, contemporary, fashionable, trendy (Brit. informal), up-to-date, present day, in vogue, in, du jour (French), à la mode, culty

obsolete

adjective
No longer in use:
Idioms: in mothballs, on the shelf.
verb
To make or become obsolete:
noun
Something that is obsolete:
Translations
مَهْجُورٌمَهْجور، قَديم ، بَطُل اسْتِعْمالُه
zastaralý
forældet
vanhentunut
zastario
usang
úreltur
すたれた
쓸모 없어진
nebevartojamaspasenęs
novecojis
föråldrad
ที่ล้าสมัย
eskimişkullanılmayanmodası geçmişterk edilmiş
lỗi thời

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəliːt] ADJ [weapon, equipment, machine] → obsoleto; [attitude, idea, system] → obsoleto, anticuado; [process, practice, word, law] → obsoleto, en desuso; [ticket] → caduco
to become obsolete (gen) → quedarse obsoleto, caer en desuso; [ticket] → caducar

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəliːt] adjobsolète

obsolete

adjveraltet, überholt, obsolet (geh); to become obsoleteveralten

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəˌliːt] adjobsoleto/a, in disuso; (word) → desueto/a

obsolete

(ˈobsəliːt) , ((American also) obsəˈli:t) adjective
no longer in use. obsolete weapons.

obsolete

مَهْجُورٌ zastaralý forældet veraltet απαρχαιωμένος obsoleto vanhentunut obsolète zastario obsoleto すたれた 쓸모 없어진 verouderd umoderne przestarzały obsoleto устаревший föråldrad ที่ล้าสมัย modası geçmiş lỗi thời 荒废的
References in classic literature ?
A word which some lexicographer has marked obsolete is ever thereafter
But with this, neither the author nor the public have any other concern than as some observation is necessary upon those parts of the work which thirteen years have made comparatively obsolete.
In this manner, a man of talent, and of great antiquarian erudition, limited the popularity of his work, by excluding from it every thing which was not sufficiently obsolete to be altogether forgotten and unintelligible.
From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed in the fragrance of its obsolete names, and dreamed again.
With respect to walls, those who say that a courageous people ought not to have any, pay too much respect to obsolete notions; particularly as we may see those who pride themselves therein continually confuted by facts.
One thing, however, may be said for the docks of the Port of London on both sides of the river: for all the complaints of their insufficient equipment, of their obsolete rules, of failure (they say) in the matter of quick despatch, no ship need ever issue from their gates in a half- fainting condition.
This figure unlocked and held open the grating as for the passage of another, who presently appeared, in the form of a young man of small stature and uncommon self-importance, dressed in an obsolete and very gaudy fashion.
LAP, in the old obsolete language, signifies high; and UNTUH, a governor; from which they say, by corruption, was derived LAPUTA, from LAPUNTUH.
He had formed a style for himself by a close imitation of Sir Thomas Browne; he used elaborate sentences, carefully balanced, and obsolete, resplendent words: it gave his writing an appearance of individuality.
That is, I did not attempt anything like his tales in kind; they must have seemed too hopelessly far away in taste and time, but I studied his verse, and imitated a stanza which I found in some of his things and had not found elsewhere; I rejoiced in the freshness and sweetness of his diction, and though I felt that his structure was obsolete, there was in his wording something homelier and heartier than the imported analogues that had taken the place of the phrases he used.
But they are human; and the limit of American endurance is found in the obsolete institution of a bedroom candle.
an obsolete, essentially meaningless exclamation, like "I swear