obsolete


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ob·so·lete

 (ŏb′sə-lēt′, ŏb′sə-lēt′)
adj.
1. No longer in use: an obsolete word.
2. Outmoded in design, style, or construction: an obsolete locomotive.
3. Biology Vestigial or rudimentary, especially in comparison with related or ancestral species, as the tailbone of an ape. Used of an organ or other part of an organism.
tr.v. ob·so·let·ed, ob·so·let·ing, ob·so·letes
To cause to become obsolete.

[Latin obsolētus, past participle of obsolēscere, to fall into disuse; see obsolescent.]

ob′so·lete′ly adv.
ob′so·lete′ness n.
ob′so·let′ism n.

obsolete

(ˈɒbsəˌliːt; ˌɒbsəˈliːt)
adj
1. out of use or practice; not current
2. out of date; unfashionable or outmoded
3. (Biology) biology (of parts, organs, etc) vestigial; rudimentary
[C16: from Latin obsolētus worn out, past participle of obsolēre (unattested), from ob- opposite to + solēre to be used]
ˈobsoˌletely adv
ˈobsoˌleteness n
Usage: The word obsoleteness is hardly ever used, obsolescence standing as the noun form for both obsolete and obsolescent

ob•so•lete

(ˌɒb səˈlit, ˈɒb səˌlit)

adj., v. -let•ed, -let•ing. adj.
1. no longer in general use: obsolete customs.
2. of a discarded or outmoded type: an obsolete battleship.
3. (of a linguistic form) no longer in use, esp., out of use for at least the past century: used in this dictionary to indicate that a word has not been in widespread use since c1750. Abbr.: Obs.
4. rudimentary in comparison with the corresponding part or trait in related species or in individuals of the opposite sex.
v.t.
5. to make obsolete; antiquate.
[1570–80; < Latin obsolētus, past participle of obsolēscere to fall into disuse, perhaps =ob- ob-sol(ēre) to be accustomed to + -ēscere -esce]
ob`so•lete′ly, adv.
ob`so•lete′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obsolete - no longer in use; "obsolete words"
noncurrent - not current or belonging to the present time

obsolete

adjective outdated, old, passé, ancient, antique, old-fashioned, dated, discarded, extinct, past it, out of date, archaic, disused, out of fashion, out, antiquated, anachronistic, outmoded, musty, old hat, behind the times, superannuated, antediluvian, outworn, démodé (French), out of the ark (informal), vieux jeu (French) The company says the plant is obsolete and does not merit further investment.
new, the new, current, modern, contemporary, fashionable, trendy (Brit. informal), up-to-date, present day, in vogue, in, du jour (French), à la mode, culty

obsolete

adjective
No longer in use:
Idioms: in mothballs, on the shelf.
verb
To make or become obsolete:
noun
Something that is obsolete:
Translations
مَهْجُورٌمَهْجور، قَديم ، بَطُل اسْتِعْمالُه
zastaralý
forældet
vanhentunut
zastario
usang
úreltur
すたれた
쓸모 없어진
nebevartojamaspasenęs
novecojis
föråldrad
ที่ล้าสมัย
eskimişkullanılmayanmodası geçmişterk edilmiş
lỗi thời

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəliːt] ADJ [weapon, equipment, machine] → obsoleto; [attitude, idea, system] → obsoleto, anticuado; [process, practice, word, law] → obsoleto, en desuso; [ticket] → caduco
to become obsolete (gen) → quedarse obsoleto, caer en desuso; [ticket] → caducar

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəliːt] adjobsolète

obsolete

adjveraltet, überholt, obsolet (geh); to become obsoleteveralten

obsolete

[ˈɒbsəˌliːt] adjobsoleto/a, in disuso; (word) → desueto/a

obsolete

(ˈobsəliːt) , ((American also) obsəˈli:t) adjective
no longer in use. obsolete weapons.

obsolete

مَهْجُورٌ zastaralý forældet veraltet απαρχαιωμένος obsoleto vanhentunut obsolète zastario obsoleto すたれた 쓸모 없어진 verouderd umoderne przestarzały obsoleto устаревший föråldrad ที่ล้าสมัย modası geçmiş lỗi thời 荒废的
References in classic literature ?
Still, there will be a connection with the long past--a reference to forgotten events and personages, and to manners, feelings, and opinions, almost or wholly obsolete --which, if adequately translated to the reader, would serve to illustrate how much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life.
To common language, the word is now completely obsolete.
To use an obsolete Latin word, I might say, Ex Oriente lux; ex Occidente FRUX.
From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed in the fragrance of its obsolete names, and dreamed again.
It's a little out-of-the-way place, where they administer what is called ecclesiastical law, and play all kinds of tricks with obsolete old monsters of acts of Parliament, which three-fourths of the world know nothing about, and the other fourth supposes to have been dug up, in a fossil state, in the days of the Edwards.
In this manner, a man of talent, and of great antiquarian erudition, limited the popularity of his work, by excluding from it every thing which was not sufficiently obsolete to be altogether forgotten and unintelligible.
Works of fiction superseded by interesting company and conversation, and made obsolete by the human mind outgrowing the childishness that delights in the tales told by grownup children such as novelists and their like
LAP, in the old obsolete language, signifies high; and UNTUH, a governor; from which they say, by corruption, was derived LAPUTA, from LAPUNTUH.
It spent one million, eight hundred thousand dollars on a plant that was obsolete when it was new, ran it for a time at a loss, and then sold it to the Post Office in 1906 for one million, five hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars.
an obsolete, essentially meaningless exclamation, like "I swear
One thing, however, may be said for the docks of the Port of London on both sides of the river: for all the complaints of their insufficient equipment, of their obsolete rules, of failure (they say) in the matter of quick despatch, no ship need ever issue from their gates in a half- fainting condition.
I must remind you again that Adam had the blood of the peasant in his veins, and that since he was in his prime half a century ago, you must expect some of his characteristics to be obsolete.