obstinate


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ob·sti·nate

 (ŏb′stə-nĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Stubbornly adhering to an attitude, opinion, or course of action; obdurate.
b. Characterized by such adherence: an obstinate refusal.
2. Difficult to manage, control, or treat: an obstinate problem; an obstinate headache.

[Middle English obstinat, from Latin obstinātus, past participle of obstināre, to persist; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

ob′sti·nate·ly adv.
ob′sti·nate·ness n.
Synonyms: obstinate, stubborn, headstrong, recalcitrant, intractable, bullheaded, pigheaded, mulish
These adjectives mean tenaciously unwilling to yield. Obstinate implies unreasonable rigidity: "Mr. Quincy labored hard with the governor to obtain his assent, but he was obstinate" (Benjamin Franklin).
Stubborn pertains to innate, often perverse resoluteness or unyieldingness: "She was very stubborn when her mind was made up" (Samuel Butler).
One who is headstrong is obstinately bent on having his or her own way: The headstrong senator ignored his constituency. A person who is recalcitrant rebels against authority: The police arrested the recalcitrant protestors. Intractable refers to what is obstinate and difficult to manage or control: "the intractable ferocity of his captive" (Edgar Allan Poe).
Bullheaded suggests foolish or irrational obstinacy, and pigheaded, stupid obstinacy: Don't be bullheaded; see a doctor. "It's a pity pious folks are so apt to be pigheaded" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).
Mulish implies the obstinacy and intractability associated with a mule: "Obstinate is no word for it, for she is mulish" (Ouida).

obstinate

(ˈɒbstɪnɪt)
adj
1. adhering fixedly to a particular opinion, attitude, course of action, etc
2. self-willed or headstrong
3. difficult to subdue or alleviate; persistent: an obstinate fever.
[C14: from Latin obstinātus, past participle of obstināre to persist in, from ob- (intensive) + stin-, variant of stare to stand]
ˈobstinately adv

ob•sti•nate

(ˈɒb stə nɪt)

adj.
1. firmly or stubbornly adhering to a purpose, opinion, or course of action.
2. not easily or readily treated, controlled, or overcome, as a disease.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin obstinātus, past participle of obstināre to set one's mind on, be determined =ob- ob- + stināre, derivative of stāre to stand]
ob′sti•nate•ly, adv.
ob′sti•nate•ness, n.
syn: See stubborn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.obstinate - persist stubbornly; "he obstinates himself against all rational arguments"
hang in, persevere, persist, hang on, hold on - be persistent, refuse to stop; "he persisted to call me every night"; "The child persisted and kept asking questions"
Adj.1.obstinate - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
uncompromising, inflexible, sturdy - not making concessions; "took an uncompromising stance in the peace talks"; "uncompromising honesty"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
intractable - not tractable; difficult to manage or mold; "an intractable disposition"; "intractable pain"; "the most intractable issue of our era"; "intractable metal"
2.obstinate - stubbornly persistent in wrongdoingobstinate - stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing
unregenerated, unregenerate - not reformed morally or spiritually; "unregenerate human nature"; "unregenerate conservatism"
3.obstinate - resistant to guidance or discipline; "Mary Mary quite contrary"; "an obstinate child with a violent temper"; "a perverse mood"; "wayward behavior"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"

obstinate

obstinate

adjective
Translations
عَنيدعَنِيدٌ
tvrdohlavýumíněný
stædig
itsepäinen
tvrdoglav
csökönyöskonokmakacsönfejű
òrár
頑固な
완고한
ietiepīgsstūrgalvīgs
trmast
envis
ดื้อดึง
ngoan cố

obstinate

[ˈɒbstɪnɪt] ADJ
1. (= stubborn) [person] → obstinado, terco
to be obstinate about sthobstinarse en algo, ser obstinado con algo
2. (= tenacious) [resistance] → tenaz; [illness] → persistente

obstinate

[ˈɒbstɪnət] adj
[person] → obstiné(e)
[refusal, determination] → obstiné(e)
[weed, stain] → tenace
[pain, cold] → persistant(e)

obstinate

adj
personhartnäckig, starrsinnig; stain, weedshartnäckig; nail etcwiderspenstig; to remain obstinatestur bleiben; to have an obstinate streakzur Sturheit neigen; he was obstinate in insisting that …er bestand stur or hartnäckig darauf, dass …
resistance, illnesshartnäckig

obstinate

[ˈɒbstɪnɪt] adj (gen) → ostinato/a; (resistance) → strenuo/a; (illness) → persistente
as obstinate as a mule → testardo/a come un mulo

obstinate

(ˈobstinət) adjective
refusing to yield, obey etc. She won't change her mind – she's very obstinate.
ˈobstinacy (-nəsi) noun
ˈobstinately adverb

obstinate

عَنِيدٌ umíněný stædig hartnäckig πεισματάρικος obstinado itsepäinen obstiné tvrdoglav ostinato 頑固な 완고한 halsstarrig hardnakket uparty obstinado упрямый envis ดื้อดึง inatçı ngoan cố 倔强的

ob·sti·nate

a. obstinado-a,
pop. cabeza dura, cabeciduro-a.
References in classic literature ?
He is very decided, but never will be obstinate, if you reason kindly, not oppose impatiently.
The old man made a gesture of resignation, though his rigid features still betrayed his obstinate adherence to a distrust, which he derived from a sort of hereditary contempt of his enemy, rather than from any present signs which might warrant so uncharitable a feeling.
It was a wild story, perhaps, but seemed not altogether so incredible to those who could remember what an inflexibly obstinate old fellow this wizard Maule had been.
But at this question, Queequeg, who had twice or thrice before taken part in similar ceremonies, looked no ways abashed; but taking the offered pen, copied upon the paper, in the proper place, an exact counterpart of a queer round figure which was tattooed upon his arm; so that through Captain Peleg's obstinate mistake touching his appellative, it stood something like this: -- Quohog his mark.
There's your law of precedents; there's your utility of traditions; there's the story of your obstinate survival of old beliefs never bottomed on the earth, and now not even hovering in the air
They never could agree all together; there were so many arguments upon each side, and one would be obstinate, and no sooner would the rest have convinced him than it would transpire that his arguments had caused another to waver.
But it was an obstinate pair of shoulders; they could not seem to learn the trick of stooping with any sort of deceptive naturalness.
This moment came, but although all other unmasked; the secret knight still refused to allow his features to be seen, till at last the Queen driven by curiosity, and vexed at the obstinate refusal; commanded him to open his Vizier.
Wilson tried to convince him that if he had been present himself when Angelo told him about the homicide committed by Luigi, he would not have considered the act discreditable to Luigi; but the obstinate old man was not to be moved.
Cole's carriagehorses returning from exercise, or a stray letterboy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, and a string of dawdling children round the baker's little bowwindow eyeing the gingerbread, she knew she had no reason to complain, and was amused enough; quite enough still to stand at the door.
I knew him to be a very good sort of man, and I thought well of his daughter--better than she deserved, for, with a most obstinate and ill-judged secrecy, she would tell nothing, would give no clue, though she certainly knew all.
I prognosticate for myself an obstinate cold, at least.