obstinateness


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Related to obstinateness: puerile, relieve, sedulously

ob·sti·nate

 (ŏb′stə-nĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Stubbornly adhering to an attitude, opinion, or course of action; obdurate.
b. Characterized by such adherence: an obstinate refusal.
2. Difficult to manage, control, or treat: an obstinate problem; an obstinate headache.

[Middle English obstinat, from Latin obstinātus, past participle of obstināre, to persist; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

ob′sti·nate·ly adv.
ob′sti·nate·ness n.
Synonyms: stubborn, headstrong, recalcitrant, intractable, bullheaded, pigheaded, mulish
These adjectives mean tenaciously unwilling to yield. Obstinate implies unreasonable rigidity: "Mr. Quincy labored hard with the governor to obtain his assent, but he was obstinate" (Benjamin Franklin).
Stubborn pertains to innate, often perverse resoluteness or unyieldingness: "She was very stubborn when her mind was made up" (Samuel Butler).
One who is headstrong is obstinately bent on having his or her own way: The headstrong senator ignored his constituency. A person who is recalcitrant rebels against authority: The police arrested the recalcitrant protestors. Intractable refers to what is obstinate and difficult to manage or control: "the intractable ferocity of his captive" (Edgar Allan Poe).
Bullheaded suggests foolish or irrational obstinacy, and pigheaded, stupid obstinacy: Don't be bullheaded; see a doctor. "It's a pity pious folks are so apt to be pigheaded" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).
Mulish implies the obstinacy and intractability associated with a mule: "It is a mark of my own chalky insecurity and mulish youth that I hounded Andy every chance I got" (Brian Doyle).
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In a way the latter's obstinateness and unyielding reaction to the modern and postmodern foxy mirages devised by imperialism will be pivotal for him not to succumb to a future that never comes.
And in imperial fashion, it is ensuring that the "laowai" or foreigners play the game by Chinese rules, with tactics ranging from bureaucratic obstinateness to outright political bullying.
A superior can tolerate obstinateness (or outright defiance, as we saw in some cases) only to a certain point, especially from a subordinate manager.