obtuse


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Related to obtuse: obtuse triangle

ob·tuse

 (ŏb-to͞os′, -tyo͞os′, əb-)
adj. ob·tus·er, ob·tus·est
1.
a. Lacking quickness of perception or intellect.
b. Characterized by a lack of intelligence or sensitivity: an obtuse remark.
c. Not distinctly felt: an obtuse pain.
2.
a. Not sharp, pointed, or acute in form; blunt.
b. Having an obtuse angle: an obtuse triangle.
c. Botany Having a blunt or rounded tip: an obtuse leaf.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin obtūsus, past participle of obtundere, to blunt; see obtund.]

ob·tuse′ly adv.
ob·tuse′ness n.
Usage Note: Obtuse is sometimes used where one might expect abstruse instead, but the Usage Panel is divided on the acceptability of these usages. In our 2009 survey, 55 percent of the Usage Panel rejected obtuse meaning "recondite," as in The reader has to struggle through dense prose and obtuse references to modern philosophers. Some 52 percent rejected the word when used to mean "indirect or oblique" in the sentence Divorce is mentioned, and there are a few obtuse references to sex. By contrast, 56 percent accepted sentences in which obtuse was used to mean "hard to follow or understand" in the phrases obtuse instructions and obtuse explanation. Perhaps the use of the word as a sophisticated synonym of stupid makes these extended derogatory uses more tolerable than they otherwise might be.

obtuse

(əbˈtjuːs)
adj
1. mentally slow or emotionally insensitive
2. (Mathematics) maths
a. (of an angle) lying between 90° and 180°
b. (of a triangle) having one interior angle greater than 90°
3. not sharp or pointed
4. indistinctly felt, heard, etc; dull: obtuse pain.
5. (Botany) (of a leaf or similar flat part) having a rounded or blunt tip
[C16: from Latin obtūsus dulled, past participle of obtundere to beat down; see obtund]
obˈtusely adv
obˈtuseness, obˈtusity n

ob•tuse

(əbˈtus, -ˈtyus)

adj.
1. not quick or alert in perception, feeling, or intellect; insensitive; dull.
2. not sharp, acute, or pointed; blunt.
3. (of a leaf, petal, etc.) rounded at the extremity.
4. indistinctly felt or perceived, as pain or sound.
[1500–10; < Latin obtūsus blunt; see obtund]
ob•tuse′ly, adv.
ob•tuse′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obtuse - of an angle; between 90 and 180 degrees
acute - of an angle; less than 90 degrees
2.obtuse - (of a leaf shape) rounded at the apex
unsubdivided, simple - (botany) of leaf shapes; of leaves having no divisions or subdivisions
3.obtuse - lacking in insight or discernment; "too obtuse to grasp the implications of his behavior"; "a purblind oligarchy that flatly refused to see that history was condemning it to the dustbin"- Jasper Griffin
undiscerning - lacking discernment
4.obtuse - slow to learn or understand; lacking intellectual acuity; "so dense he never understands anything I say to him"; "never met anyone quite so dim"; "although dull at classical learning, at mathematics he was uncommonly quick"- Thackeray; "dumb officials make some really dumb decisions"; "he was either normally stupid or being deliberately obtuse"; "worked with the slow students"
stupid - lacking or marked by lack of intellectual acuity

obtuse

adjective stupid, simple, slow, thick, dull, dim, dense, dumb (informal), sluggish, retarded, simple-minded, dozy (Brit. informal), witless, stolid, dopey (informal), moronic, brainless, uncomprehending, cretinous, unintelligent, half-witted, slow on the uptake (informal), braindead (informal), dumb-ass (informal), doltish, dead from the neck up (informal), boneheaded (slang), thickheaded, dull-witted, imperceptive, slow-witted, muttonheaded (slang), thick as mince (Scot. informal), woodenheaded (informal) I think you're being deliberately obtuse.
quick, bright, sharp, keen, smart, clever, shrewd, astute

obtuse

adjective
Lacking in intelligence:
Informal: thick.
Slang: dimwitted, dopey.
Translations
مُنْفَرِج الزاويَه
stump
tylppä
sljór
plats
slötrubbig
geniş açı

obtuse

[əbˈtjuːs] ADJ
1. (Math) → obtuso
2. (= stupid, insensitive) [person] → obtuso, torpe; [remark] → desacertado, poco inteligente
he can be very obtuse at timesa veces puede ser muy obtuso
now you're just being obtusete empeñas en no comprender

obtuse

[əbˈtjuːs] adj
[person] → obtus(e)
[angle] → obtus(e)

obtuse

adj
(Geometry) → stumpf
personbegriffsstutzig, beschränkt; are you just being obtuse?tust du nur so beschränkt?

obtuse

[əbˈtjuːs] adj (gen) (Math) → ottuso/a; (remark) → stolto/a

obtuse

(əbˈtjuːs) adjective
(of an angle) greater than a right-angle.

ob·tuse

a. obtuso-a.
1. que le falta agudeza mental;
2. romo-a, mellado-a.
References in classic literature ?
We do well to worship God in His works; and I know none of them in which so many of His attributes--so much of His own spirit shines, as in this His faithful servant; whom to know and not to appreciate, were obtuse insensibility in me, who have so little else to occupy my heart.
I may be very obtuse, Holmes, but I fail to see what this suggests.
I was now seeing David once at least every week, his mother, who remained culpably obtuse to my sinister design, having instructed Irene that I was to be allowed to share him with her, and we had become close friends, though the little nurse was ever a threatening shadow in the background.
To this Sancho made answer, "Indeed those gentlemen the judges that send you to me might have spared themselves the trouble, for I have more of the obtuse than the acute in me; but repeat the case over again, so that I may understand it, and then perhaps I may be able to hit the point.
He remembered with what a callous selfishness his uncle had treated her, how obtuse he had been to her humble, devoted love.
When the elder Osborne gave what he called "a hint," there was no possibility for the most obtuse to mistake his meaning.
Lying in it, as in a grave or sarcophagus, with a hurried drapery of sheet and blanket thrown across it, was the body of a heavily-made man, with an obtuse head, and coarse, mean, common features.
A heavy club of wood, or a broad bar of iron - a chair - any large, heavy, and obtuse weapon would have produced such results, if wielded by the hands of a very powerful man.
Her tone, as she uttered the exclamation, had a plaintive and really exquisite melody thrilling through it, yet without subduing a certain something which an obtuse auditor might still have mistaken for asperity.
Marian, primed to a humorous mood, would discover the queer-shaped flints aforesaid, and shriek with laughter, Tess remaining severely obtuse.
Her view of the matter was that, though the inhabitants of the hives were familiar and friendly with her by this time and recognized that she came among them without hostile intent, it might well happen that among so many thousands there might be one slow-witted enough and obtuse enough not to have grasped this fact.
Reflects charming old Lady Tippins on Veneering's right; with an immense obtuse drab oblong face, like a face in a tablespoon, and a dyed Long Walk up the top of her head, as a convenient public approach to the bunch of false hair behind, pleased to patronize Mrs Veneering opposite, who is pleased to be patronized.