occasionalism


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Related to occasionalism: Double aspect theory

oc·ca·sion·al·ism

 (ə-kā′zhə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The doctrine that God is the sole causal actor and that all events are merely occasions on which God brings about what are normally thought of as their effects.

occasionalism

(əˈkeɪʒənəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the post-Cartesian theory that the seeming interconnection of mind and matter is effected by God

occasionalism

the Cartesian philosophic doctrine that holds that mind and matter are incapable of affecting each other and that their reciprocal action must be owing to the intervention of God. — occasionalist, n.occasionalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Kant's early writings subscribe to an interactionist cosmology opposed to both Leibniz's pre-established harmony and Malebranche's occasionalism.
Al-Attas points out that it is in the light of these Qur'anic verses bearing on the true nature of causality that the original philosophical contribution and significance of kalam atomism or occasionalism has to be appreciated: (65) namely as essentially an attempt to demonstrate rationally the absolute poverty of any ontic autonomy on the part of nature and all natural processes, and hence the impossibility of real or efficacious linear or multilinear horizontal naturalistic causality as envisaged in the original Darwinian and various neo-Darwinian theories of evolution.
Any external action on a substance can be performed by God alone; and, in the absence of occasionalism, (29) all natural changes in finite subjects must be brought about by the internal workings of the substances themselves.
Thomas Aquinas and Durandus of Saint Pourcain stand on one side, with their respective rejections of medieval Islamic occasionalism.
Necessary Connections and Continuous Creation: Malebranche's Two Arguments for Occasionalism, SUKJAE LEE
For example, God is responsible for connecting mind and body; the view verges on occasionalism, although Boyle's position is not wholly determinate.
For the purposes of this introduction we can put aside the complex and highly charged issues of ontologism and occasionalism.
This article (1) explains how these two issues, omnipotence and relations, became so interestingly tangled together, (2) tries to see which of the two men mentioned above got the better of their exchange, and finally (3) draws out some important consequences for fourteenth-century discussions of causality, occasionalism, and onmipotence.
This paper shows that Descartes's metaphysical commitments do not necessitate either form of occasionalism, and that he is more plausibly and charitably read as appropriating elements of Scholastic views on concurrence to bridge the gap between his metaphysics and physics.
The core thesis of Malebranche's doctrine of occasionalism is that God is the sole true cause, where a true cause is one that has the power to initiate change and for which the mind perceives a necessary connection between it and its effects.
This argument involves examining the status of sensations in Descartes, innate ideas, and Malebranche's occasionalism.
It is argued that while Cordemoy is indeed a thorough going occasionalist, most scholarship on Cordemoy has failed to recognize that his major philosophical work, the Six Discours, does not provide sufficient grounds for assessing Cordemoy's occasionalism (especially with respect to the mind's own causal powers), and that one must turn to some later writings, unpublished in his lifetime, for his views on the soul and causation.