octothorpe


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oc·to·thorpe

 (ŏk′tə-thôrp′)
n.
The symbol (#).

[Coined in the 1960s by researchers at Bell Telephone Laboratories : octo- (probably in reference to the eight endpoints of the lines in the symbol) + -thorpe (perhaps from thorp, in reference to the resemblance of the symbol to a village surrounded by fields, or after James Francis Thorpebecause one of the researchers was an advocate of the restoration of Thorpe's Olympic medals).]

octothorpe

- The pound key on a keyboard or keypad is technically an octothorpe.
See also related terms for keyboard.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Octothorpe Software Corporation of Vancouver received a $369,159 contract for its Amadeus Decision System, a sophisticated yet easy-to-use solution that helps improve the effectiveness and efficiency of decision making.
To know the answer, let's study history a bit, beginning with the octothorpe.
Houston (blogger, Edinburgh) combines an interesting history of punctuation marks, such as the pilcrow, octothorpe, and ampersand, with setting them in their context, not only within the relatively small world of typesetting but in their overall milieu.
Houston has infused a seemingly mundane subject with considerable verve & erudition, inspiring us to pepper these pages with the en dash, em dash, pilcrow, interrobang, circumflex, manicule, virgule (aka solidus), guillemet, asterisk, dagger, double dagger, ellipsis, hedera (aka fleuron), ampersand, and octothorpe (aka hashtag).
En ingLes se Le conoce como octothorpe que, de acuerdo con eL Oxford English Dictionary, se acuno en Los BeLL TeLephone Laboratories, quienes crearon La cuadricuLa teLefonica de botones con eL sistema <<duaL-tone muLtifrequency>> o <<Touch-Tone>>, y que para 1964, agrego dos simboLos con otras funciones: * y #, <<star>> y <<octotherp>>.
The pound key (#) on the keyboard is called an OCTOTHORPE.
Usually regarded as a sign for a number, the correct term for the # symbol is an octothorpe.
An octothorpe "#" indicates the attribute is a component of the primary identifier for the entity type, and an asterisk "*" means the attribute is mandatory.