oddity

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odd·i·ty

 (ŏd′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. odd·i·ties
1. One that is odd.
2. The state or quality of being odd; strangeness.

oddity

(ˈɒdɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. an odd person or thing
2. an odd quality or characteristic
3. the condition of being odd

odd•i•ty

(ˈɒd ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. an odd or remarkably unusual person, thing, or event.
2. an odd characteristic or trait; peculiarity.
3. the quality of being odd; strangeness or eccentricity.
[1705–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oddity - eccentricity that is not easily explained
eccentricity - strange and unconventional behavior
2.oddity - a strange attitude or habit
strangeness, unfamiliarity - unusualness as a consequence of not being well known
3.oddity - something unusual -- perhaps worthy of collecting
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
collectable, collectible - things considered to be worth collecting (not necessarily valuable or antique)
collector's item, piece de resistance, showpiece - the outstanding item (the prize piece or main exhibit) in a collection

oddity

noun
1. misfit, eccentric, crank (informal), nut (slang), maverick, flake (slang, chiefly U.S.), oddball (informal), loose cannon, nonconformist, odd man out, wacko (slang), screwball (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), card (informal), fish out of water, square peg (in a round hole) (informal), odd fish (Brit. informal), odd bird (informal), rara avis, weirdo or weirdie (informal) He's a bit of an oddity, but quite harmless.
2. anomaly, exception, curiosity, abnormality, rarity, departure, deviation His book remains something of an oddity.

oddity

noun
A person who is appealingly odd or curious:
Informal: card, oddball.
Translations
غَرابَه، شَخْص غَريب الأطْوار
særhed
furîufugl; furîuhlutur
antikanın tekituhaf kimse

oddity

[ˈɒdɪtɪ] N
1. (= odd thing) → cosa f rara; (= odd trait) → manía f
he has his odditiestiene sus manías
he's a real oddityes un tipo realmente raro
one of the oddities of the situationuno de los aspectos raros de la situación
2. (= strangeness) → rareza f

oddity

[ˈɒdɪti] n
(= odd thing) → curiosité f
to be an oddity (= out of the ordinary) → être une curiosité
(= odd characteristic) → bizarrerie fodd-job man [ˌɒdˈdʒɒbmæn] nhomme m à tout faireodd jobs npltravaux mpl diversodd-looking [ˈɒdlʊkɪŋ] adj [person, thing] → curieux/euse
They were an odd-looking couple → Ils formaient un couple curieux.

oddity

n
(= strangeness) (of person)Wunderlichkeit f, → Absonderlichkeit f, → Eigenartigkeit f; (= strangeness: of thing) → Ausgefallenheit f
(= odd person)komischer Kauz or Vogel; (who doesn’t fit) → Kuriosität f; (= odd thing)Kuriosität f

oddity

[ˈɒdɪtɪ] n
a. (also oddness) → stranezza, bizzarria
b. (person) → originale m/f

odd

(od) adjective
1. unusual; strange. He's wearing very odd clothes; a very odd young man.
2. (of a number) that cannot be divided exactly by 2. 5 and 7 are odd (numbers).
3. not one of a pair, set etc. an odd shoe.
4. occasional; free. at odd moments.
ˈoddityplural ˈoddities noun
a strange person or thing. He's a bit of an oddity.
ˈoddly adverb
strangely. He is behaving very oddly.
ˈoddment noun
a piece left over from something. an oddment of material.
odds noun plural
1. chances; probability. The odds are that he will win.
2. a difference in strength, in favour of one side. They are fighting against heavy odds.
odd jobs
(usually small) jobs of various kinds, often done for other people. He's unemployed, but earns some money by doing odd jobs for old people.
odd job man
a person employed to do such jobs.
be at odds
to be quarrelling. He has been at odds with his brother for years.
make no odds
to be unimportant. We haven't got much money, but that makes no odds.
oddly enough
it is strange or remarkable (that). I saw John this morning. Oddly enough, I was just thinking I hadn't seen him for a long time.
odd man out / odd one out
1. a person or thing that is different from others. In this test, you have to decide which of these three objects is the odd one out.
2. a person or thing that is left over when teams etc are made up. When they chose the two teams, I was the odd man out.
odds and ends
small objects etc of different kinds. There were various odds and ends lying about on the table.
what's the odds?
it's not important; it doesn't matter. We didn't win the competition but what's the odds?
References in classic literature ?
I don't mind dwarf drones any more than you do (they all die in July), but this steady hatch of oddities frightens me, Melissa
Most of the Oddities would not, and many, on account of their malformations, could not, go through a day's field-work; but the Wax-moths, who were always busy on the brood-comb, found pleasant home occupations for them.
One can only remember his cheery temper, his admiration for the jokes in PUNCH, his little oddities - like his strange passion for borrowing looking-glasses, for instance.
Their moral eccentricities, like their oddities of dress, their wild theories and paradoxes, were an entertainment which amused her, but had not the slightest influence on her convictions.
In this great rambling-place she need dread no near association with the sick-room; and, with all my uncle's oddities, I am sure she will not think the offer of his friendship an offer to be despised.
Instead of being the youngest of the family, it rather seemed to have aggregated into itself the ages, not only of these living specimens of the breed, but of all its forefathers and foremothers, whose united excellences and oddities were squeezed into its little body.
With her old instinctive quickness to discern kindred spirits she knew she was going to like Miss Cornelia, in spite of uncertain oddities of opinion, and certain oddities of attire.
Elton's oddities, or of any thing else unpleasant, and enjoy all that was enjoyable to the utmost.
This was only a friendly Raveloe-way of jesting with the half-crazy oddities of a miser, but it had perhaps helped to throw Silas into a more than usually excited state.
Thus, in Hamlet, let us say, the grotesqueness of the grave-digger, the flowers of the mad girl, the fantastic finery of Osric, the pallor of the ghost and the grin of the skull are all oddities in a sort of tangled wreath round one plain tragic figure of a man in black.
Howbeit, this, though far from the most aggravated, is perhaps the strangest, instance on record, of marital delinquency; and, moreover, as remarkable a freak as may be found in the whole list of human oddities.
Now and then came a flash of cockney humour, now and then some old lady, a character such as Charles Dickens might have drawn, would amuse them by her garrulous oddities.