ode


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ode

 (ōd)
n.
1. A lyric poem of some length, usually of a serious or meditative nature and having an elevated style and formal stanzaic structure.
2.
a. A choric song of classical Greece, often accompanied by a dance and performed at a public festival or as part of a drama.
b. A classical Greek poem modeled on the choric ode and usually having a three-part structure consisting of a strophe, an antistrophe, and an epode.

[French, choric song, from Old French, from Late Latin ōdē, ōda, from Greek aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

od′ic (ō′dĭk) adj.

ode

(əʊd)
n
1. (Poetry) a lyric poem, typically addressed to a particular subject, with lines of varying lengths and complex rhythms. See also Horatian ode, Pindaric ode
2. (Poetry) (formerly) a poem meant to be sung
[C16: via French from Late Latin ōda, from Greek ōidē, from aeidein to sing]

ode

(oʊd)

n.
a lyric poem, typically with an irregular metrical form and expressing exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Late Latin ōda < Greek aoidḗ song, derivative of aeídein to sing]
od′ic, adj.

-ode1

,
a suffix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “like,” “having the nature of”; used to form nouns: phyllode. Compare -oid.
[< Greek -ōdēs]

-ode2

,
a combining form meaning “way,” “path,” used esp. in the names of devices through which electrical current passes: electrode.
[< Greek -odos, comb. form of hodós]

ode

A lyric poem, usually in elaborate form, typically addressed to and eulogizing a particular subject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ode - a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
epithalamium - an ode honoring a bride and bridegroom
Horatian ode, Sapphic ode - an ode with several stanzas
Pindaric, Pindaric ode - an ode form used by Pindar; has triple groups of triple units
choral ode - ode sung by the chorus in classical Greek drama
Translations
قَصيدَه غِنائِيَّه
óda
ode
oodi
óda
óîur, lofsöngur
odė
oda
odă
óda
ode

ode

[əʊd] Noda f

ode

[ˈəʊd] node f

ode

nOde f (→ to, on an +acc)

ode

[əʊd] node f

ode

(əud) noun
a poem written to a person or thing. `Ode to a Nightingale' was written by John Keats.
References in classic literature ?
If it were possible to translate the comprehensive and melodious language in which he spoke, the ode might read something like the following: "Manitou
This was always followed by Collins's Ode on the Passions, wherein I particularly venerated Mr.
An ode in four hundred lines would not have seemed so touching to Esther; her eyes filled with happy tears; yes, here was the father of whom she had dreamed, whom Dick had described; simple, enthusiastic, unworldly, kind, a painter at heart, and a fine gentleman in manner.
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
Neither was the Great Stone Face forgotten, for the poet had celebrated it in an ode, which was grand enough to have been uttered by its own majestic lips.
Phoebus (who, as I have told you, was an exquisite poet) forthwith began to make an ode about the poor mother's grief; and, if we were to judge of his sensibility by this beautiful production, he must have been endowed with a very tender heart.
The pairing of the birds is an idyl, not tedious as our idyls are; a tempest is a rough ode, without falsehood or rant; a summer, with its harvest sown, reaped, and stored, is an epic song, subordinating how many admirably executed parts.
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines.
Sit down and write an ode instead of tearing up and down like that.
After other interesting exercises, including an invocation from Bishop Nelson, of Georgia, a dedicatory ode by Albert Howell, Jr.
As it was, every one was conscious that by observing certain rules, such as punctuality and quiet, by cooking well, and performing other small duties, one ode after another was satisfactorily restored to the world, and they shared the continuity of the scholar's life.
I studied Greek, and I learned so much of it as to read a chapter of the Testament, and an ode of Anacreon.