odontology


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o·don·tol·o·gy

 (ō′dŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the structure, development, and abnormalities of the teeth.

o·don′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o·don′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
o′don·tol′o·gist n.

odontology

(ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Dentistry) the branch of science concerned with the anatomy, development, and diseases of teeth and related structures
odontological, odontologic adj
ˌodonˈtologist n

odontology

1. the science that studies teeth and their surrounding tissues, especially the prevention and cure of their diseases.
2. dentistry. Also called dentology. — odontologist, n.odontological, adj.
See also: Teeth

odontology

The study of teeth and diseases of teeth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teethodontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
crownwork, jacket crown, jacket, cap, crown - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
filling - (dentistry) a dental appliance consisting of any of various substances (as metal or plastic) inserted into a prepared cavity in a tooth; "when he yawned I could see the gold fillings in his teeth"; "an informal British term for `filling' is `stopping'"
impression - (dentistry) an imprint of the teeth and gums in wax or plaster; "the dentist took an impression for use in preparing an inlay"
inlay - (dentistry) a filling consisting of a solid substance (as gold or porcelain) fitted to a cavity in a tooth and cemented into place
occlusion - (dentistry) the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed
bonding - (dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth; resinous material is applied to the surface of the tooth where it adheres to the tooth's enamel
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
cosmetic dentistry - the branch of dentistry dealing with the appearance of the teeth
dental surgery - the branch of dentistry involving surgical procedures
endodontia, endodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the dental pulp
dental orthopaedics, dental orthopedics, orthodontia, orthodontics, orthodonture - the branch of dentistry dealing with the prevention or correction of irregularities of the teeth
periodontia, periodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the gums and other structures around the teeth
prosthodontia, prosthodontics - the branch of dentistry dealing with the replacement of teeth and related mouth or jaw structures by artificial devices
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
crowned - having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; "had many crowned teeth"
uncrowned - not having an (artificial) crown on a tooth; used especially of molars and bicuspids; "uncrowned teeth badly in need of attention"
Translations

odontology

[ˌɒdɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Nodontología f

odontology

nOdontologie f, → Zahnheilkunde f

o·don·tol·o·gy

n. odontología, estudio de los dientes y del tratamiento de las enfermedades dentales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice:Acquisition of various equipment for the new premises of the faculty of odontology
Furnari has extensive experience in lecturing and work in forensic odontology and has a master's degree in Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness.
These include areas like fingerprint, firearm, toolmark, and trace evidence; fire scene, explosives, and vehicle investigations; forensic anthropology, odontology, pathology, toxicology, and biology and DNA analysis; and controlled substances analysis.
Although in recent decades Odontology has followed a more conservative philosophy, and dental extraction has been considered a last treatment option by the dental surgeon, in some cases it becomes the only option (7).
J Bergstrom, Tabacco Smoking and Chronic Destructive periodontal desease, Odontology 2004; 2, 139-140.
sup][2] Although interest in forensic odontology was heightened in the latter part of the 19 [sup]th century, the process has been used for more than 2000 years.
5) The American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO) recognizes dental hygienists as allied health professionals who have the education and licensures applicable to disaster preparedness and response training, particularly in terms of disaster victim identification (DVI).
This knowledge of tooth morphology can be employed in the fields of forensic odontology, anthropology and odontometry as it can provide information on the phylogenetic relationship between species as well as variations and diversities within a population.
China Pioneer Pharma runs a diversified range of imported products (substantially all of which are prescription products), covering ophthalmology, pain management, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastroenterology, immunology and other therapeutic areas and a range of medical devices covering four medical specialties, including ophthalmology, odontology and wound care.
Biomedical startup company BioMe, founded by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) researchers, is offering a synthetic bone equivalent used for bone restoration operations in odontology.
Forensic odontology or forensic dentistry was defined by Keiser-Nielson in 1970 as "that branch of forensic medicine which in the interest of justice deals with the proper handling and examination of dental evidence and with the proper evaluation and presentation of the dental findings" (3)