oestrogen


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oes·tro·gen

 (ĕs′trə-jən)
n.
Variant of estrogen.

oestrogen

(ˈiːstrədʒən; ˈɛstrə-) or

estrogen

n
(Biochemistry) any of several steroid hormones, that are secreted chiefly by the ovaries and placenta, that induce oestrus, stimulate changes in the female reproductive organs during the oestrous cycle, and promote development of female secondary sexual characteristics
[C20: from oestrus + -gen]
oestrogenic, estrogenic adj
ˌoestroˈgenically, ˌestroˈgenically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oestrogen - a general term for female steroid sex hormones that are secreted by the ovary and responsible for typical female sexual characteristics
sex hormone, steroid hormone, steroid - any hormone affecting the development and growth of sex organs
DES, diethylstilbestrol, diethylstilboestrol, stilbestrol, stilboestrol - a potent estrogen used in medicine and in feed for livestock and poultry
estradiol, oestradiol - the most powerful female hormone that occurs naturally; synthesized and used to treat estrogen deficiency and breast cancer
estriol, oestriol - a naturally occurring estrogenic hormone; a synthetic form is used to treat estrogen deficiency
estrone, Estronol, oestrone, theelin - a naturally occurring weak estrogenic hormone secreted by the mammalian ovary; synthesized (trade name Estronol) and used to treat estrogen deficiency
hexestrol - estrogen compound used to treat menstrual irregularities and menopausal symptoms and to prevent pregnancy
mestranol - a synthetic form of estrogen used in combination with a progestin in oral contraceptives
Translations

oestrogen

estrogen (US) [ˈiːstrəʊdʒən] Nestrógeno m

oestrogen

[ˈɛstrədʒən ˈiːstrədʒən] estrogen (US) nœstrogène m

oestrogen

n (Brit) (Med, Pharm) → Östrogen nt

oestrogen

estrogen (Am) [ˈiːstrəʊdʒn] nestrogeno
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, April 12 (ANI): Swedish researchers have found a way of utilising the positive effects of oestrogen in mice so that only the skeleton is acted on.
One of the difficulties of breast cancer treatment at present is the lack of available therapy for patients with oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.
This not only helps to explain the high clinical response rates reported, even in patients that already had received both hormonal therapies and chemotherapy, but also distinguishes the treatment from other available oestrogen blockers.
A G[alpha]s protein-coupled membrane receptor, distinct from the classical oestrogen receptor, transduces rapid effects from oestradiol on [[[Ca.