off-year election


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off-year election

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the US) an election held in a year when a presidential election does not take place
References in periodicals archive ?
Does an off-year election prophesy the next presidential contest?
While an off-year election, the ballot has notable tax measures.
Politics are a cyclical thing, and if Hillary Clinton had won, the Republicans would have had every chance to firm up their bastions even further in the off-year election that will take place two years from now.
And because the electorate is an off-year election like 2010 and is more Republican than in a presidential year, many of those GOP senators are running in states that Obama won.
On the one hand, Republicans have successfully nationalized every presidential and off-year election because they are waging an ever-more-intense and polarized counter-revolution against the country's national trends.
Michael Traugott, professor of political science and director of the Institute for Social Research Center for Political Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, said he sees the economy as a key factor that influenced voters in the off-year election.
While politicians crisscross the state and talk about all sorts of issues in this off-year election, others are planting the seeds for important conversations to come.
Before Congress adjourning for the off-year election, members stepped forward in a bipartisan effort to enact legislation that will benefit our nation's disabled veterans," said Violante.
We have a more conservative electorate in an off-year election.
The power of the "pocketbook" issue was shown more clearly perhaps in 1958 than in any off-year election in history .
One million gave online in the off-year election of 2002.
But even these numbers are weaker than in recent off-year election cycles and identical to support of congressional incumbents in June 1994--five months before Democrats lost control of Congress to Republicans.