offal


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of·fal

 (ô′fəl, ŏf′əl)
n.
1. Waste parts, especially of a butchered animal.
2. Refuse; rubbish.

[Middle English : of-, off (from Old English, from of; see apo- in Indo-European roots) + fal, fall.]

offal

(ˈɒfəl)
n
1. (Cookery) the edible internal parts of an animal, such as the heart, liver, and tongue
2. dead or decomposing organic matter
3. refuse; rubbish
[C14: from off + fall, referring to parts fallen or cut off; compare German Abfall rubbish]

of•fal

(ˈɔ fəl, ˈɒf əl)

n.
1. waste parts, esp. the viscera or inedible remains of a butchered animal.
2. refuse or rubbish; garbage.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =of off + fal fall; compare Dutch afval]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.offal - viscera and trimmings of a butchered animal often considered inedible by humans
organs, variety meat - edible viscera of a butchered animal
Translations
indmad
belsõség
innmatur
plaučkepeniai
subprodukti

offal

[ˈɒfəl] Nasaduras fpl, menudillos mpl

offal

[ˈɒfəl] nabats mpl

offal

n no plInnereien pl; (fig)Abfall m, → Ausschuss m

offal

[ˈɒfl] nfrattaglie fpl

offal

(ˈofəl) noun
the parts of an animal eg the heart, liver etc which are considered as food for people.
References in classic literature ?
I have seen Mary contending with the pigs for the offal thrown into the street.
Hunger was pushed out of the tall houses, in the wretched clothing that hung upon poles and lines; Hunger was patched into them with straw and rag and wood and paper; Hunger was repeated in every fragment of the small modicum of firewood that the man sawed off; Hunger stared down from the smokeless chimneys, and started up from the filthy street that had no offal, among its refuse, of anything to eat.
Far in this den of infamous resort, there was a low-browed, beetling shop, below a pent-house roof, where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal, were bought.
And I doubt he's got a soft place in his head, else why should he be turned round the finger by that offal Dunsey as nobody's seen o' late, and let him kill that fine hunting hoss as was the talk o' the country?
The nasty grasses upon which he lay exuded the effluvium of sweaty bodies, of decayed animal matter and of offal.
The moment the travellers were fairly on the march, and the camp was abandoned, these starving hangers-on would hasten to the deserted fires, to seize upon the half-picked bones, the offal and garbage that lay about; and, having made a hasty meal, with many a snap and snarl and growl, would follow leisurely on the trail of the caravan.
But that's the way; folks mun allays choose by contrairies, as if they must be sorted like the pork--a bit o' good meat wi' a bit o' offal.
Thus did he pray, and Pallas Minerva heard his prayer; she made his hands and his feet feel light, and when the runners were at the point of pouncing upon the prize, Ajax, through Minerva's spite slipped upon some offal that was lying there from the cattle which Achilles had slaughtered in honour of Patroclus, and his mouth and nostrils were all filled with cow dung.
Another wrench and scoop sent the head and offal flying, and the empty fish slid across to Uncle Salters, who snorted fiercely.
Surely we must run away, Free People, and beg leave of the peoples of the north for the offal of dead cattle
The literary histories might keep record of them, but it is loath some to think of those heaps of ordure, accumulated from generation to generation, and carefully passed down from age to age as something precious and vital, and not justly regarded as the moral offal which they are.
Even Dango, the hyena, eater of offal, would, at the moment, have seemed a tidbit to Numa.