offence

(redirected from offences)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

of·fence

 (ə-fĕns′)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of offense.

offence

(əˈfɛns) or

offense

n
1. a violation or breach of a law, custom, rule, etc
2.
a. any public wrong or crime
b. a nonindictable crime punishable on summary conviction
3. annoyance, displeasure, or resentment
4. give offence give offence to someone to cause annoyance or displeasure to someone
5. take offence to feel injured, humiliated, or offended
6. a source of annoyance, displeasure, or anger
7. (Military) attack; assault
8. archaic injury or harm
9. (American Football) the offense (ˈɒfɛns) American football
a. the team that has possession of the ball
b. the members of a team that play in such circumstances
ofˈfenceless, ofˈfenseless adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.offence - the action of attacking an enemyoffence - the action of attacking an enemy  
military operation, operation - activity by a military or naval force (as a maneuver or campaign); "it was a joint operation of the navy and air force"
counteroffensive - a large scale offensive (more than a counterattack) undertaken by a defending force to seize the initiative from an attacking force
dirty war - an offensive conducted by secret police or the military of a regime against revolutionary and terrorist insurgents and marked by the use of kidnapping and torture and murder with civilians often being the victims; "thousands of people disappeared and were killed during Argentina's dirty war in the late 1970s"
push back, rollback - the act of forcing the enemy to withdraw
2.offence - the team that has the ball (or puck) and is trying to score
team, squad - a cooperative unit (especially in sports)
defending team, defence, defense - (sports) the team that is trying to prevent the other team from scoring; "his teams are always good on defense"
3.offence - a feeling of anger caused by being offendedoffence - a feeling of anger caused by being offended; "he took offence at my question"
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
4.offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
behavior, conduct, doings, behaviour - manner of acting or controlling yourself
derision, ridicule - the act of deriding or treating with contempt
indelicacy - an impolite act or expression
insolence - an offensive disrespectful impudent act
affront, insult - a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect; "turning his back on me was a deliberate insult"
presumption - a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming; "his presumption was intolerable"
rebuff, slight - a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval)
5.offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by lawoffence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
barratry - the offense of vexatiously persisting in inciting lawsuits and quarrels
capital offense - a crime so serious that capital punishment is considered appropriate
cybercrime - crime committed using a computer and the internet to steal a person's identity or sell contraband or stalk victims or disrupt operations with malevolent programs
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
forgery - criminal falsification by making or altering an instrument with intent to defraud
fraud - intentional deception resulting in injury to another person
Had crime - (Islam) serious crimes committed by Muslims and punishable by punishments established in the Koran; "Had crimes include apostasy from Islam and murder and theft and adultery"
highjack, hijack - seizure of a vehicle in transit either to rob it or divert it to an alternate destination
mayhem - the willful and unlawful crippling or mutilation of another person
infraction, misdemeanor, misdemeanour, violation, infringement - a crime less serious than a felony
perpetration, committal, commission - the act of committing a crime
attempt, attack - the act of attacking; "attacks on women increased last year"; "they made an attempt on his life"
Tazir crime - (Islam) minor crimes committed by Muslims; crimes that are not mentioned in the Koran so judges are free to punish the offender in any appropriate way; "in some Islamic nations Tazir crimes are set by legislation"
regulatory offence, regulatory offense, statutory offence, statutory offense - crimes created by statutes and not by common law
thuggery - violent or brutal acts as of thugs
high treason, lese majesty, treason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
vice crime - a vice that is illegal
victimless crime - an act that is legally a crime but that seem to have no victims; "he considers prostitution to be a victimless crime"
war crime - a crime committed in wartime; violation of rules of war
criminal law - the body of law dealing with crimes and their punishment
abduct, kidnap, nobble, snatch - take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransom; "The industrialist's son was kidnapped"
shanghai, impress - take (someone) against his will for compulsory service, especially on board a ship; "The men were shanghaied after being drugged"
commandeer, highjack, hijack, pirate - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"
extort - obtain through intimidation
blackmail - obtain through threats
scalp - sell illegally, as on the black market
bootleg - sell illicit products such as drugs or alcohol; "They were bootlegging whiskey"
black market, run - deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor
fob off, foist off, palm off - sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
push - sell or promote the sale of (illegal goods such as drugs); "The guy hanging around the school is pushing drugs"
black marketeer - deal on the black market
pyramid - use or deal in (as of stock or commercial transaction) in a pyramid deal
ransom, redeem - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
traffic - deal illegally; "traffic drugs"
rustle, lift - take illegally; "rustle cattle"
shoplift - steal in a store
stick up, hold up - rob at gunpoint or by means of some other threat
mug - rob at gunpoint or with the threat of violence; "I was mugged in the streets of New York last night"
pirate - copy illegally; of published material
plagiarise, plagiarize, lift - take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property
crib - take unauthorized (intellectual material)
bribe, grease one's palms, buy, corrupt - make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence; "This judge can be bought"
rake off - take money from an illegal transaction
buy off, pay off - pay someone with influence in order to receive a favor

offence

noun
1. crime, wrong, sin, lapse, fault, violation, wrongdoing, trespass, felony, misdemeanour, delinquency, misdeed, transgression, peccadillo, unlawful act, breach of conduct It is a criminal offence to sell goods which are unsafe.
2. outrage, shock, anger, trouble, bother, grief (informal), resentment, irritation, hassle (informal), wrath, indignation, annoyance, ire (literary), displeasure, pique, aggravation, hard feelings, umbrage, vexation, wounded feelings The book might be published without creating offence.
3. insult, injury, slight, hurt, harm, outrage, put-down (slang), injustice, snub, affront, indignity, displeasure, rudeness, slap in the face (informal), insolence His behaviour was an offence to his hosts.
take offence be offended, resent, be upset, be outraged, be put out (informal), be miffed (informal), be displeased, take umbrage, be disgruntled, be affronted, be piqued, take the needle (informal), get riled, take the huff, go into a huff, be huffy You're very quick to take offence today.
Translations
إسَاءَةٌإساءَه، إهانَه، إيذاءجَريمَه، ذَنْب
trestný čin
fornærmelselovovertrædelseanstødssten
rikos
prekršaj
megsértés
afbrotástæîa óánægju/sárinda, móîgun
違反
위반
pohoršenietrestný čin
prestopekzamerazameriti
brott
การกระทำผิดกฎหมาย
sự vi phạm

offence

offense (US) [əˈfens] N
1. (= crime) → delito m; (moral) → pecado m, falta f (Sport) → falta f
first offenceprimer delito
second offencereincidencia f
to commit an offencecometer un delito
it is an offence toestá prohibido ..., se prohíbe ...
2. (= insult) → ofensa f, agravio m
no offence!; no offence meantsin ánimo de ofender
no offence was intended; he intended no offenceno tenía intención de ofender a nadie
it is an offence to the eyehace daño a la vista
to give or cause offence (to sb)ofender (a algn)
to take offence (at sth)ofenderse or sentirse ofendido (por algo)

offence

[əˈfɛns] offense (US) n (= crime) → infraction f
to commit an offence → commettre une infraction drug offence, criminal offence
(to sb's feelings) to give offence (= offend people) → offenser certaines personnes
to cause offence → offenser certaines personnes
to give offence to sb → offenser qn
to cause offence to sb → offenser qn
to avoid offence (= to avoid giving offence) → pour n'offenser personne
to take offence → s'offenser
to take offence at sth → s'offenser de qch
(used as sentence adverb) no offence, but ... → sans vouloir vous offenser or t'offenser ...

offence

, (US) offense
n
(Jur) (= crime)Straftat f, → Delikt nt; (minor) → Vergehen nt; to commit an offencesich strafbar machen; it is an offence to …… ist bei Strafe verboten; first offenceerste Straftat, erstes Vergehen; second offenceRückfall m; an offence against …ein Verstoß mgegen …
(fig) an offence against good tasteeine Beleidigung des guten Geschmacks; an offence against common decencyeine Erregung öffentlichen Ärgernisses
no pl (to sb’s feelings) → Kränkung f, → Beleidigung f; (to sense of decency, morality etc) → Anstoß m; to cause or give offence to somebodyjdn kränken or beleidigen; without giving offenceohne kränkend zu sein; to take offence at somethingwegen etw gekränkt or beleidigt sein; she is quick to take offencesie ist leicht gekränkt or beleidigt; I meant no offenceich habe es nicht böse gemeint; no offence to the Germans, of course!damit will/wollte ich natürlich nichts gegen die Deutschen gesagt haben; no offence (meant)nichts für ungut; no offence (taken)ich nehme dir das nicht übel
(Eccl, = sin) → Sünde f
(= attack, US: = attacking part of team) → Angriff m; offence is the best defence (Brit) offense is the best defense (US) → Angriff ist die beste Verteidigung

offence

offense (Am) [əˈfɛns] n
a. (crime) → infrazione f, contravvenzione f, reato
first offence → primo reato
to commit an offence → commettere un reato
it is an offence to ... → è vietato dalla legge...
b. (moral) → offesa
to give offence (to sb) → offendere (qn)
to take offence (at sth) → offendersi (per qc)

offend

(əˈfend) verb
1. to make feel upset or angry. If you don't go to her party she will be offended; His criticism offended her.
2. to be unpleasant or disagreeable. Cigarette smoke offends me.
ofˈfence , (American) ofˈfense noun
1. (any cause of) anger, displeasure, hurt feelings etc. That rubbish dump is an offence to the eye.
2. a crime. The police charged him with several offences.
ofˈfender noun
a person who offends, especially against the law.
ofˈfensive (-siv) adjective
1. insulting. offensive remarks.
2. disgusting. an offensive smell.
3. used to attack. an offensive weapon.
noun
an attack. They launched an offensive against the invading army.
ofˈfensively adverb
ofˈfensiveness noun
be on the offensive
to be making an attack. She always expects people to criticize her and so she is always on the offensive.
take offence (with at)
to be offended (by something). He took offence at what she said.

offence

إسَاءَةٌ trestný čin fornærmelse Vergehen αδίκημα infracción rikos délit prekršaj reato 違反 위반 overtreding straffbar handling obraza ofensa оскорбление brott การกระทำผิดกฎหมาย saldırı sự vi phạm 犯罪

offence

, offense
n. ofensa, agravio, afrenta.
References in classic literature ?
Lastly, when David is discovered of some offence and expresses sorrow therefor, he does that thing no more for a time, but looks about him for other offences, whereas Porthos incontinently repeats his offence, in other words, he again buries his bone in the backyard, and marvels greatly that I know it, although his nose be crusted with earth.
I had thought the circumstances of our last meeting would have left such an impression on his mind as to render him cold and distant ever after: instead of that, he appeared not only to have forgotten all former offences, but to be impenetrable to all present incivilities.
When he had done laughing, he said to Don Quixote, "You have replied on your own behalf so stoutly, Sir Knight of the Lions, that there is no occasion to seek further satisfaction for this, which, though it may look like an offence, is not so at all, for, as women can give no offence, no more can ecclesiastics, as you very well know.
In his lay capacity, he persisted in sitting down in the damp to such an insane extent, that when his coat was taken off to be dried at the kitchen fire, the circumstantial evidence on his trousers would have hanged him if it had been a capital offence.
1886, and abode in it until 1892, made it at once the scene of such constant offence that he had no time, if he had the temper, for defence.
But, perhaps, this is one reason which hath determined me to act in a milder manner with you: for, as no private resentment should ever influence a magistrate, I will be so far from considering your having deposited the infant in my house as an aggravation of your offence, that I will suppose, in your favour, this to have proceeded from a natural affection to your child, since you might have some hopes to see it thus better provided for than was in the power of yourself, or its wicked father, to provide for it.
The valuable assistance which you rendered to the inquiry after the lost jewel is still an unpardoned offence, in the present dreadful state of Rachel's mind.
The present chapter has given greater offence than any other
You have touched the very cause of my fear,'' said the Outlaw; ``my men are rough by practice and nature, the King is hasty as well as good-humoured; nor know I how soon cause of offence may arise, or how warmly it may be received it is time this revel were broken off.
She knew not how such an offence as hers might be classed by the laws of worldly politeness, to what a degree of unforgivingness it might with propriety lead, nor to what rigours of rudeness in return it might justly make her amenable.
Let a decree issue declaring ingenuity a capital offence.
Thus, the story here presented will be told by more than one pen, as the story of an offence against the laws is told in Court by more than one witness--with the same object, in both cases, to present the truth always in its most direct and most intelligible aspect; and to trace the course of one complete series of events, by making the persons who have been most closely connected with them, at each successive stage, relate their own experience, word for word.