offending


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of·fend

 (ə-fĕnd′)
v. of·fend·ed, of·fend·ing, of·fends
v.tr.
1. To cause displeasure, anger, resentment, or wounded feelings in: We were offended by his tasteless jokes.
2. To be displeasing or disagreeable to: Onions offend my sense of smell.
v.intr.
1. To result in displeasure: Bad manners may offend.
2.
a. To violate a moral or divine law; sin.
b. To violate a rule or law: offended against the curfew.

[Middle English offenden, from Old French offendre, from Latin offendere; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots.]

of·fend′er n.
Synonyms: offend, insult, affront, outrage
These verbs mean to cause resentment, humiliation, or hurt. To offend is to cause displeasure, wounded feelings, or repugnance in another: "He often offended men who might have been useful friends" (John Lothrop Motley).
Insult implies gross insensitivity, insolence, or contemptuous rudeness: "My father had insulted her by refusing to come to our wedding" (James Carroll).
To affront is to insult openly, usually intentionally: "He continued to belabor the poor woman in a studied effort to affront his hated chieftain" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
Outrage implies the flagrant violation of a person's integrity, pride, or sense of right and decency: "He revered the men and women who transformed this piece of grassland into a great city, and he was outraged by the attacks on their reputation" (James S. Hirsch).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.offending - offending against or breaking a law or rule; "contracts offending against the statute were canceled"
unoffending - not offending; "an unoffending motorist should not have been stopped"

offending

adjective upsetting, disturbing, offensive, unpleasant, unsavoury, unpalatable, disagreeable The book was withdrawn and the offending passages deleted.
Translations

offending

[əˈfendɪŋ]
A. ADJ (esp hum) the dentist proceeded to fill the offending toothel dentista procedió a empastar el diente culpable
the book was withdrawn for the offending passages to be deletedel libro fue retirado para eliminar los pasajes responsables de la controversia
he put the offending object out of sightguardó el objeto causante del conflicto
he put the offending jacket back in the wardrobepuso de nuevo en el armario la chaqueta que según parecía era un atentado contra el buen gusto
B. CPD offending behaviour N [of criminal, delinquent] → conducta f delictiva

offending

[əˈfɛndɪŋ] adjincriminé(e)
the offending item → l'article incriminé

offending

adj
(= giving offence) remarkkränkend, beleidigend
(= law-breaking) personzuwiderhandelnd; behaviourkriminell; the offending party (Jur) → die schuldige Partei; (fig)der/die Schuldige
(= causing problem)störend; (= faulty) wire, partdefekt; the offending objectder Stein des Anstoßes

offending

[əˈfɛndɪŋ] adj (often) (hum) (word, object) → incriminato/a
References in classic literature ?
Meg had an extra row of little curlpapers across her forehead, Jo had copiously anointed her afflicted face with cold cream, Beth had taken Joanna to bed with her to atone for the approaching separation, and Amy had capped the climax by putting a colthespin on her nose to uplift the offending feature.
The Huron sprang like a tiger on his offending and already retreating country man, but the falling form of Uncas separated the unnatural combatants.
For a secret like that they would have done a good many sluggings--but the next day Goldberger informed them that the offending gambler had got wind of what was coming to him, and had skipped the town.
Clare, after all his promises of goodness, took a wicked pleasure in these mistakes, calling Topsy to him whenever he had a mind to amuse himself, and getting her to repeat the offending passages, in spite of Miss Ophelia's remonstrances.
Emma felt the bad taste of her friend, but let it pass with a "very true; and it would be a small consolation to her, for the clownish manner which might be offending her every hour of the day, to know that her husband could write a good letter.
Marianne was afraid of offending, and said no more on the subject; but the kind of approbation which Elinor described as excited in him by the drawings of other people, was very far from that rapturous delight, which, in her opinion, could alone be called taste.
He - probably swayed by prudential consideration of the folly of offending a good tenant - relaxed a little in the laconic style of chipping off his pronouns and auxiliary verbs, and introduced what he supposed would be a subject of interest to me, - a discourse on the advantages and disadvantages of my present place of retirement.
Lecount's patience and tact were sorely tried in the effort to avoid offending him.
I had perception enough to know that my mother was the victim always; that she was afraid to speak to me or to be kind to me, lest she should give them some offence by her manner of doing so, and receive a lecture afterwards; that she was not only ceaselessly afraid of her own offending, but of my offending, and uneasily watched their looks if I only moved.
I laugh, when those who at the Spear are bold And vent'rous, if that fail them, shrink and fear What yet they know must follow, to endure Exile, or ignominy, or bonds, or pain, The sentence of thir Conquerour: This is now Our doom; which if we can sustain and bear, Our Supream Foe in time may much remit His anger, and perhaps thus farr remov'd Not mind us not offending, satisfi'd With what is punish't; whence these raging fires Will slack'n, if his breath stir not thir flames.
Thou art speaking but sooth, Rebecca,'' said Isaac, giving way to these weighty arguments ``it were an offending of Heaven to betray the secrets of the blessed Miriam; for the good which Heaven giveth, is not rashly to be squandered upon others, whether it be talents of gold and shekels of silver, or whether it be the secret mysteries of a wise physician assuredly they should be preserved to those to whom Providence hath vouchsafed them.
During the course of these troubles, the emperors of Blefusca did frequently expostulate by their ambassadors, accusing us of making a schism in religion, by offending against a fundamental doctrine of our great prophet Lustrog, in the fifty-fourth chapter of the Blundecral (which is their Alcoran).