offspring


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off·spring

 (ôf′sprĭng′, ŏf′-)
n. pl. offspring
1. The organism or organisms resulting from sexual or asexual reproduction.
2. A child or children of a parent or parents: the offspring of Zeus and Leto.
3. The result or product of something: "the glaciers, the offspring of the gentle snow" (John Muir).

[Middle English ofspring, from Old English : of, off; see off + springan, to rise.]

offspring

(ˈɒfˌsprɪŋ)
n
1. the immediate descendant or descendants of a person, animal, etc; progeny
2. a product, outcome, or result

off•spring

(ˈɔfˌsprɪŋ, ˈɒf-)

n., pl. -spring, -springs.
1. children or young of a particular parent or progenitor; descendants; progeny.
2. a child or animal in relation to its parent or parents.
3. the product or result of something.
[before 950]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.offspring - the immediate descendants of a personoffspring - the immediate descendants of a person; "she was the mother of many offspring"; "he died without issue"
baby - the youngest member of a group (not necessarily young); "the baby of the family"; "the baby of the Supreme Court"
by-blow, illegitimate, illegitimate child, love child, whoreson, bastard - the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parents
child, kid - a human offspring (son or daughter) of any age; "they had three children"; "they were able to send their kids to college"
eldest, firstborn - the offspring who came first in the order of birth
grandchild - a child of your son or daughter
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
heir, successor - a person who inherits some title or office
2.offspring - something that comes into existence as a result; "industrialism prepared the way for acceptance of the French Revolution's various socialistic offspring"; "this skyscraper is the solid materialization of his efforts"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
3.offspring - any immature animal
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
hatchling - any recently hatched animal (especially birds)
orphan - a young animal without a mother
young mammal - any immature mammal
young bird - a bird that is still young
spat - a young oyster or other bivalve
young fish - a fish that is young

offspring

noun
1. child, baby, kid (informal), youngster, infant, successor, babe, toddler, heir, issue, tot, descendant, wean (Scot.), little one, brat, bairn (Scot.), nipper (informal), chit, scion, babe in arms (informal), sprog (slang), munchkin (informal, chiefly U.S.), rug rat (slang), littlie (Austral. informal), ankle-biter (Austral. slang) She was less anxious about her offspring than she had been.
child parent, predecessor, ancestor, forerunner, forebear, forefather, progenitor, begetter, procreator
2. children, kids (informal), young, family, issue, stock, seed (chiefly biblical), fry, successors, heirs, spawn, descendants, brood, posterity, lineage, progeny, scions Characteristics are often passed from parents to offspring.

offspring

noun
1. A group consisting of those descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
2. One descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
Translations
potomstvo
jälkeläinen
potomakpotomstvo
mladič

offspring

[ˈɒfsprɪŋ] N (pl inv) → descendencia f, prole f
to die without offspringmorir sin dejar descendencia

offspring

[ˈɒfsprɪŋ] nprogéniture f

offspring

n
singSprössling m, → Kind nt, → Abkömmling m; (of animal)Junge(s) nt
pl (form, hum, of people) → Nachwuchs m (hum), → Nachkommen pl; (of animals)Junge pl; how are your offspring? (hum)wie gehts dem Nachwuchs? (hum)

offspring

[ˈɒfˌsprɪŋ] n (pl inv, of person) → rampollo; (with pl sense) → prole f; (of animal) → piccolo/a; (with pl sense) → piccoli/e

offspring

n. descendencia, sucesión, hijos.
References in classic literature ?
For as offspring resemble their parents, so usury is money bred of money.
When, on the one hand, we see domesticated animals and plants, though often weak and sickly, yet breeding quite freely under confinement; and when, on the other hand, we see individuals, though taken young from a state of nature, perfectly tamed, long-lived, and healthy (of which I could give numerous instances), yet having their reproductive system so seriously affected by unperceived causes as to fail in acting, we need not be surprised at this system, when it does act under confinement, acting not quite regularly, and producing offspring not perfectly like their parents or variable.
A much more important rule, which I think may be trusted, is that, at whatever period of life a peculiarity first appears, it tends to appear in the offspring at a corresponding age, though sometimes earlier.
JUPITER ISSUED a proclamation to all the beasts of the forest and promised a royal reward to the one whose offspring should be deemed the handsomest.
Intermarriages (arranged by the Priests) between the sons and daughters of these more intellectual members of the lower classes generally result in an offspring approximating still more to the type of the Equal-Sided Triangle.
Square offspring has sometimes resulted from a slightly Irregular Triangle; but in almost every such case the Irregularity of the first generation is visited on the third; which either fails to attain the Pentagonal rank, or relapses to the Triangular.
Worms of the riper grave unhid By any kindly coffin lid, Obscene and shameless to the light, Seethe in insatiate appetite, Through putrid offal; while above The hissing blow-fly seeks his love, Whose offspring, supping where they supt, Consume corruption twice corrupt.
Why, I said, the principle has been already laid down that the best of either sex should be united with the best as often, and the inferior with the inferior, as seldom as possible; and that they should rear the offspring of the one sort of union, but not of the other, if the flock is to be maintained in first-rate condition.
Many Theresas have been born who found for themselves no epic life wherein there was a constant unfolding of far-resonant action; perhaps only a life of mistakes, the offspring of a certain spiritual grandeur ill-matched with the meanness of opportunity; perhaps a tragic failure which found no sacred poet and sank unwept into oblivion.
The "Titanomachy", ascribed both to Eumelus of Corinth and to Arctinus of Miletus, began with a kind of Theogony which told of the union of Heaven and Earth and of their offspring the Cyclopes and the Hundred-handed Giants.
Their foster mothers may not even have had an egg in the incubator, as was the case with Sola, who had not commenced to lay, until less than a year before she became the mother of another woman's offspring.
Accustomed to ease, and unequal to the struggles incident to an infant society, the affluent emigrant was barely enabled to maintain his own rank by the weight of his personal superiority and acquirements; but, the moment that his head was laid in the grave, his indolent and comparatively uneducated offspring were compelled to yield precedency to the more active energies of a class whose exertions had been stimulated by necessity.