ogre


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Related to ogre: Ogrish

o·gre

(ō′gər)
n.
1. A giant or monster in legends and fairy tales that eats humans.
2. A person who is considered particularly cruel, brutish, or ugly.

[French, probably ultimately from Latin Orcus, god of the underworld.]

o′gre·ish (ō′gər-ĭsh, ō′grĭsh) adj.

ogre

(ˈəʊɡə)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in folklore) a giant, usually given to eating human flesh
2. any monstrous or cruel person
[C18: from French, perhaps from Latin Orcus god of the infernal regions]
ˈogreish adj
ˈogress fem n

o•gre

(ˈoʊ gər)

n.
1. a monster in fairy tales, usu. represented as a hideous giant who feeds on human flesh.
2. a monstrously ugly, cruel, or barbarous person.
[1705–15; < French, perhaps « Latin Orcus Orcus]
o′gre•ish, o•grish (ˈoʊ grɪʃ) adj.
o′gre•ish•ly, o′grish•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ogre - a cruel wicked and inhuman personogre - a cruel wicked and inhuman person  
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
demoniac - someone who acts as if possessed by a demon
2.ogre - (folklore) a giant who likes to eat human beings
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
giant - an imaginary figure of superhuman size and strength; appears in folklore and fairy tales
ogress - (folklore) a female ogre

ogre

noun
1. fiend, monster, beast, villain, brute, bogeyman Some people think of bank managers as ogres.
2. monster, giant, devil, beast, demon, bogey, spectre, fiend, ghoul, bogeyman, bugbear an ogre in a fairy tale

ogre

noun
A perversely bad, cruel, or wicked person:
Translations
غول
ogre
obr lidožroutzlobr
uhyre
hirviöjättijättiläinenraakalainen
emberevõ óriásogre
tröll
milzis cilvēkēdājs
oger
ogr
ogroogre
obor-ľudožrút
rese

ogre

[ˈəʊgəʳ] Nogro m

ogre

[ˈəʊgər] nogre m

ogre

n (Myth) → Menschen fressender Riese; (fig)Ungeheuer nt, → Unmensch m

ogre

[ˈəʊgəʳ] norco

ogre

(ˈəugə) noun
in fairy stories, a frightening, cruel giant.
References in classic literature ?
The Goths awoke, joining in the fight, but all their swords were of no avail against the ogre.
The first object with which they had an association, or of which they had a remembrance, was a large black board with a dry Ogre chalking ghastly white figures on it.
He knew with half his mind that he was drawing near to the castle of an ogre--he had forgotten that he was the ogre.
Why have you brought such excitement into my theater;" the huge fellow asked Pinocchio with the voice of an ogre suffering with a cold.
He had been to visit his friend the Cornish ogre, and had stayed with him for seven years.
But the Ogre advanced under the pilotage of Ma, and Ma said,
Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how they had been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savage ogre Polyphemus.
So, with Spartan firmness, the young authoress laid her first-born on her table, and chopped it up as ruthlessly as any ogre.
The mortgage was depicted as a cross between a fiend and an ogre, and held an axe uplifted in his red right hand.
The most awful circumstance of the affair is yet to be told: for this ogre, or whatever it was, had a riding habit like Mrs.
Ogres and bugaboos and I had been happy bed-fellows, compared with these terrors that made their bed with me throughout my childhood, and that still bed with me, now, as I write this, full of years.
Night and the Noseless One were ogres that beset the way of light and life.