old lady


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old lady

n. Slang
1. One's mother.
2. One's wife or girlfriend.

old lady

n
1. an informal term for mother1, wife1
2. (Animals) a large noctuid moth, Mormo maura, that has drab patterned wings originally thought to resemble an elderly Victorian lady's shawl

old` la′dy


n.
Slang.
1. one's mother.
2. one's wife.
3. one's girlfriend or female lover.
[1775–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.old lady - your own wifeold lady - your own wife; "meet my old lady"  
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
Translations
References in classic literature ?
A very old lady, in a lofty cap and faded silk gown--no less a personage than Mr.
The curtain at the bed's head was hastily drawn back, and a motherly old lady, very neatly and precisely dressed, rose as she undrew it, from an arm-chair close by, in which she had been sitting at needle-work.
Suddenly a large old carriage drove up, and a large old lady sat in it: she looked at the little girl, felt compassion for her, and then said to the clergyman:
I say, every morning of my life, that you'll do it at last, Sept,' remarked the old lady, looking on; 'and so you will.
To all such questions he returned the same answer--namely, that the old lady was an influential foreigner, a Russian, a Countess, and a grande dame, and that she had taken the suite which, during the previous week, had been tenanted by the Grande Duchesse de N.
We have come by another way to our place of meeting yesterday, and--by the Great Seal, here's the old lady again
The old lady would neither listen to nor see anything; Malicorne had long been one of her antipathies.
Very often it suits a longsuffering family that a strong-tongued, iron-willed old lady should disport herself about India in this fashion; for certainly pilgrimage is grateful to the Gods.
In her bower she was, but not alone, for besides the old lady her mother of whom mention has recently been made, there were present some half-dozen ladies of the neighborhood who had happened by a strange accident (and also by a little understanding among themselves) to drop in one after another, just about tea-time.
Mrs d'Urberville wants the fowls as usual," she said; but perceiving that Tess did not quite understand, she explained, "Mis'ess is a old lady, and blind.
The old lady was heavily veiled, and so weakened by age and sickness that she had to be wheeled aboard the vessel in an invalid chair.
The old lady had put the letter aside unopened, and had stopped the story at the first words.