old shoe


Also found in: Idioms.

old′-shoe′



adj.
comfortably familiar or unpretentious.
[1940–45]
References in classic literature ?
a cruel operation, which consists in cuffing a comrade who may have fallen into disgrace, not with an old shoe, but with an iron-heeled one.
The last I saw of them was, when I presently heard a scuffle behind me, and looking back, saw Joe throwing an old shoe after me and Biddy throwing another old shoe.
I have three bites for each flea upon me, and all because I looked--only looked, mark you--at an old shoe in a cow-byre.
And I throw an old shoe after you for luck, and go home again.
His heart's a piece of old shoe leather," Rachel declared, dropping the fish.
You've said so these three months, Becky," replied Sir Pitt, "and still you go hanging on to my sister, who'll fling you off like an old shoe, when she's wore you out.
The terrible weakness had dropped from him like an old shoe.
Peggotty was prepared with an old shoe, which was to be thrown after us for luck, and which he offered to Mrs.
Laughter and joy had their way; and when Anne and Gilbert left to catch the Carmody train, with Paul as driver, the twins were ready with rice and old shoes, in the throwing of which Charlotta the Fourth and Mr.
Oh dear, oh dear," he says, "there is such a comfort in one's old coat and old shoes, one's armchair and own fireside, one's own writing- desk and own library--with a little girl climbing up my neck, and saying, 'Don't go to London, papa--you must stay with Edith'; and a little boy, whom I have taught to speak the language of cats, dogs, cuckoos, and jackasses, etc.
Indeed, if I were ever to get married, I am at a loss to know which way I should choose,--George Muncaster's way or the old merry fashion, with the rice and the old shoes and the orange-blossom.
This genius Marheyo possessed in a superlative degree, as he abundantly evinced by the use to which he put those sorely bruised and battered old shoes.