oligopoly

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ol·i·gop·o·ly

 (ŏl′ĭ-gŏp′ə-lē, ō′lĭ-)
n. pl. ol·i·gop·o·lies
A market condition in which sellers are so few that the actions of any one of them will materially affect price and have a measurable impact on competitors.


ol′i·gop′o·lis′tic (-lĭs′tĭk) adj.

oligopoly

(ˌɒlɪˈɡɒpəlɪ)
n, pl -lies
(Economics) economics a market situation in which control over the supply of a commodity is held by a small number of producers each of whom is able to influence prices and thus directly affect the position of competitors
[C20: from oligo- + Greek pōlein to sell, on the model of monopoly]
ˌoliˌgopoˈlistic adj

ol•i•gop•o•ly

(ˌɒl ɪˈgɒp ə li)

n., pl. -lies.
a market situation in which prices and other factors are controlled by a few sellers.
[1890–95; oligo- + (mono) poly]
ol`i•gop`o•lis′tic, adj.

oligopoly

the market condition that exists when there are few sellers. — oligopolistic, adj.
See also: Trade

oligopoly

The control of a market by a small number of suppliers of goods or services.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
market, marketplace, market place - the world of commercial activity where goods and services are bought and sold; "without competition there would be no market"; "they were driven from the marketplace"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

oligopoly

[ˌɒlɪˈgɒpəlɪ] Noligopolio m
References in periodicals archive ?
a firm in an oligopolistic market does not have to increase price above
While the Commission has pushed market liberalization relentlessly in order to promote corporate competitiveness, many markets, for instance energy, have become more oligopolistic in the course of that process.
The authors are also careful to distinguish between different forms of SMP: i) single dominance, ii) joint dominance (as in the case of "tacit collusions" and oligopolistic markets) and, iii) leveraging of market power to an adjacent market (in the sense that NRAs should be able, for example, to prevent companies with SMP in an upstream wholesale or access market from leveraging this market power downstream into the market for retailing services).
In addition to Government monopolies, the country's economy has to contend with other oligopolistic companies.
This was the other key theme of the conference, as retailer after retailer warned that consumer choice would inevitably suffer unless action was taken in what the Co-op's Beaumont said was a market that would soon be oligopolistic.
Because information technology is highly advanced, it is susceptible to monopolistic or oligopolistic control.
Here Baumol develops his vision of a capitalist economy as consisting of a competitive price-taking sector and an oligopolistic sector in which competition occurs more often on the innovation margin rather than on the price margin.
Kawai shows the importance of the drastic demand decline and the oligopolistic trends of market structure in explaining the low TFP growth in Japan's manufacturing sectors.
But when the seventh chapter--on Oligopolistic Rivalry and Markets for Technology Trading--opens with basic theory, the next half of the book is filled with economic models, propositions, matrices, and equations, which were certainly beyond this reader's expertise (the statute of limitations on this editor's undergraduate minor in economics having long since expired).
The author traces how a combination of logistical (the economics of livestock shipment and refrigerated transportation) and political (subsidised grain shipment rates) factors encouraged the emergence of metropolitan meat packing plants in central Canada prior to the 1930s; how wartime regulation of an essential industry was instrumental in the rapid unionisation of the workforce in the 1940s; and how the oligopolistic corporate structure allowed a labour aristocracy (financially if not culturally) to emerge from nationwide pattern bargaining.
Specifically, I develop wargaming exercises that center attention on the role of the entrepreneur in subjectively ascertaining and dealing with oligopolistic uncertainties to which his firm is subject.
Her account begins with the sole proprietorships and partnerships common in 1800 and concludes with the large oligopolistic corporations that emerged at the end of the century.