on account of


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Related to on account of: due to

ac·count

 (ə-kount′)
n.
1. A narrative or record of events.
2.
a. A reason given for a particular action or event: What is the account for this loss?
b. A report relating to one's conduct: gave a satisfactory account of herself.
c. A basis or ground: no reason to worry on that account.
3.
a. A formal banking, brokerage, or business relationship established to provide for regular services, dealings, and other financial transactions.
b. A precise list or enumeration of financial transactions.
c. A sum of money deposited for checking, savings, or brokerage use.
d. A customer having a business or credit relationship with a firm: salespeople visiting their accounts.
4. A private access to a computer system or online service, usually requiring a password to enter.
5. Worth, standing, or importance: a landowner of some account.
6. Profit or advantage: turned her writing skills to good account.
tr.v. ac·count·ed, ac·count·ing, ac·counts
To consider as being; deem. See Synonyms at consider. See Usage Note at as1.
Phrasal Verb:
account for
1. To constitute the governing or primary factor in: Bad weather accounted for the long delay.
2. To provide an explanation or justification for: The suspect couldn't account for his time that night.
Idioms:
call to account
1. To challenge or contest.
2. To hold answerable for.
on account
On credit.
on account of
Because of; for the sake of: "We got married on account of the baby" (Anne Tyler).
on no account
Under no circumstances.
on (one's) own account
1. For oneself.
2. On one's own; by oneself: He wants to work on his own account.
on (someone's) account
For someone's benefit: It's nice of you to make such an effort on his account.
take into account
To take into consideration; allow for.

[Middle English, from Old French acont, from aconter, to reckon : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + cunter, to count (from Latin computāre, to sum up; see compute).]
Translations
بِسَبَب، نَظَراً لِ
provzhledem k
vegna

account

(əˈkaunt) noun
1. an arrangement by which a person keeps his money in a bank. I have (opened) an account with the local bank.
2. a statement of money owing. Send me an account.
3. a description or explanation (of something that has happened). a full account of his holiday.
4. an arrangement by which a person makes a regular (eg monthly) payment instead of paying at the time of buying. I have an account at Smiths.
5. (usually in plural) a record of money received and spent. You must keep your accounts in order; (also adjective) an account book.
acˈcountancy noun
the work of an accountant. He is studying accountancy.
acˈcountant noun
a keeper or inspector of (money) accounts. He employs an accountant to deal with his income tax.
account for
to give a reason for; to explain. I can account for the mistake.
on account of
because of. She stayed indoors on account of the bad weather.
on my/his (etc) account
because of me, him etc or for my, his etc sake. You don't have to leave early on my account.
on no account
not for any reason. On no account must you open that door.
take (something) into account, take account of (something)
to consider (something which is part of the problem etc). We must take his illness into account when assessing his work.
References in classic literature ?
As Sindbad was relating his adventures chiefly on account of the porter, he ordered, before beginning his tale, that the burden which had been left in the street should be carried by some of his own servants to the place for which Hindbad had set out at first, while he remained to listen to the story.
As for Draco's laws, they were published when the government was already established, and they have nothing particular in them worth mentioning, except their severity on account of the enormity of their punishments.
D'Artagnan desired the servants to announce him, and found on the second story (in a beautiful room called the Blue Chamber, on account of the color of its hangings) the bishop of Vannes in company with Porthos and several of the modern Epicureans.