one's


Related to one's: one's self

one's

(wʌnz)
adj
formal a third-person singular possessive corresponding to one. See one
contraction of
1. one is
2. one has
Translations

one's

[ˈwʌnz] adj (= your) → son or sa or ses
to cut one's finger → se couper le doigt
see one

one's

خاضّ svůj ens man δικός μου de uno, propio yksi, yksi jstak tietystä ryhmästä, yksi monista, toinen son svoj proprio 一般的な人を指す所有格 ~이라는 사람의 소유격 zijn ens swój seu, seu, seus наше ens คำแสดงความเป็นเจ้าของ kişinin của ai 某人的
References in classic literature ?
It would be false to say that one could ever be alone when one has one's lovely thoughts to comfort one.
To be good is to be in harmony with one's self," he replied, touching the thin stem of his glass with his pale, fine-pointed fingers.
You believe in a palace of crystal that can never be destroyed--a palace at which one will not be able to put out one's tongue or make a long nose on the sly.
Perhaps one may be out late, and had got separated from one's companions.
It was well worth one's while, even if he had no idea of buying or selling, to loiter through the bazaars and observe the various sorts of traffic that were going forward.
In all the rainy desert of autumnal London there were only two people whom the Newland Archers knew; and these two they had sedulously avoided, in conformity with the old New York tradition that it was not "dignified" to force one's self on the notice of one's acquaintances in foreign countries.
that appealed to something deeper than one's reason and one's sense of right.
We never entirely appreciated, before, what a very pleasant den our state-room is; nor how jolly it is to sit at dinner in one's own seat in one's own cabin, and hold familiar conversation with friends in one's own language.
But she was in a mood when it is almost physically disagreeable to interrupt the stride of one's thought, and she walked up and down two or three times under the trees before approaching his staircase.
That's why one pays one's cook more than one's housemaid, I suppose.
The instant one was perceived, it was necessary, in order to catch it, almost to tumble off one's horse; for in soft soil the animal burrowed so quickly, that its hinder quarters would almost disappear before one could alight.
Really, the largest green leaf in this country is a dockleaf; if one holds it before one, it is like a whole apron, and if one holds it over one's head in rainy weather, it is almost as good as an umbrella, for it is so immensely large.