one's

Related to one's: one's self

one's

(wʌnz)
adj
formal a third-person singular possessive corresponding to one. See one
contraction of
1. one is
2. one has
Translations

one's

[ˈwʌnz] adj (= your) → son or sa or ses
to cut one's finger → se couper le doigt
see one

one's

خاضّ svůj ens man δικός μου de uno, propio yksi, yksi jstak tietystä ryhmästä, yksi monista, toinen son svoj proprio 一般的な人を指す所有格 ~이라는 사람의 소유격 zijn ens swój seu, seu, seus наше ens คำแสดงความเป็นเจ้าของ kişinin của ai 某人的
References in classic literature ?
It would be false to say that one could ever be alone when one has one's lovely thoughts to comfort one.
You believe in a palace of crystal that can never be destroyed--a palace at which one will not be able to put out one's tongue or make a long nose on the sly.
Don't remind me that I have just rejected the palace of crystal for the sole reason that one cannot put out one's tongue at it.
One ought still to honour the enemy in one's friend.
You will remember that Mowgli spent a great part of his life in the Seeonee Wolf-Pack, learning the Law from Baloo, the Brown Bear; and it was Baloo who told him, when the boy grew impatient at the constant orders, that the Law was like the Giant Creeper, because it dropped across every one's back and no one could escape.
But she was in a mood when it is almost physically disagreeable to interrupt the stride of one's thought, and she walked up and down two or three times under the trees before approaching his staircase.
Still, she reflected, these sorts of skill are almost exclusively masculine; women neither practice them nor know how to value them; and one's husband's proficiency in this direction might legitimately increase one's respect for him, since mystification is no bad basis for respect.
and then I thought (in that hopeless, dreary way one does think, with the fire going out and one's birthday just over), 'Why should I lay my troubles on HER?
And though one never thinks any one good enough for the people one's fond of, he has the kindest, truest instincts, I'm sure, and though he seems nervous and his manner is not commanding, I only think these things because it's Katharine.
This life was disclosed in religion, but a religion having nothing in common with that one which Kitty had known from childhood, and which found expression in litanies and all-night services at the Widow's Home, where one might meet one's friends, and in learning by heart Slavonic texts with the priest.
Madame Stahl talked to Kitty as to a charming child that one looks on with pleasure as on the memory of one's youth, and only once she said in passing that in all human sorrows nothing gives comfort but love and faith, and that in the sight of Christ's compassion for us no sorrow is trifling--and immediately talked of other things.
What exaggeration could there be in the practice of a doctrine wherein one was bidden to turn the other cheek when one was smitten, and give one's cloak if one's coat were taken?