one another


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one another

pron.
Used to indicate a reciprocal relationship or reciprocal actions among the members of the set referred to by the antecedent: The students help one another. The waiters followed one another into the room. See Usage Note at each other.

one another

pron
the reflexive form of plural pronouns when the action, attribution, etc, is reciprocal: they kissed one another; knowing one another. Also: each other

each` oth′er


pron.
each the other; one another (used as a compound reciprocal pronoun): to love each other; to hold each other's hands; to talk to each other.
[before 1000]
usage: Usage guides advise that each other be used only of two, and one another only of three or more or of an indefinite number. In standard practice, however, these expressions are used interchangeably, without distinction as to number.

each other

one another
1. uses

You use each other or one another to show that each member of a group does something to or for the other members. For example, if Simon likes Louise and Louise likes Simon, you say that Simon and Louise like each other or like one another. Each other and one another are sometimes called reciprocal pronouns.

Each other and one another are usually the direct or indirect object of a verb.

We help each other a lot.
They sent one another gifts from time to time.

You can also use them as the object of a preposition.

Pierre and Thierry were jealous of each other.
They didn't dare to look at one another.
2. possessives

You can form possessives by adding 's to each other and one another.

I hope that you all enjoy each other's company.
Apes spend a great deal of time grooming one another's fur.
3. differences

There is very little difference in meaning between each other and one another. One another is fairly formal, and many people do not use it at all. Some people prefer to use each other when they are talking about two people or things, and one another when they are talking about more than two. However, most people do not make this distinction.

Translations
بَعْضَهُم بَعْضا
hinanden
toisensa
egymás
hver/hvor annan
jeden druhého
birbir ine

one

(wan) noun
1. the number or figure 1. One and one is two (1 + 1 = 2).
2. the age of 1. Babies start to talk at one.
pronoun
1. a single person or thing. She's the one I like the best; I'll buy the red one.
2. anyone; any person. One can see the city from here.
adjective
1. 1 in number. one person; He took one book.
2. aged 1. The baby will be one tomorrow.
3. of the same opinion etc. We are one in our love of freedom.
one-
having one (of something). a one-legged man.
oneˈself pronoun
1. used as the object of a verb, the subject of which is one. One should wash oneself every morning.
2. used in emphasis. One always has to do these things oneself.
one-night ˈstand noun
(slang) a one-night sex partner; sexual intercourse with a one-night partner.
one-ˈoff noun, adjective
(something) made, intended etc for one occasion only. It's just a one-off arrangement.
one-parent ˈfamily noun
(also single parent family) a family with only a mother or a father to look after the children.
one-ˈsided adjective
1. with one person or side having a great advantage over the other. a one-sided contest.
2. representing only one aspect of a subject. a one-sided discussion.
one-ˈway adjective
1. in which traffic can move in one direction only. a one-way street.
2. (especially American) valid for travel in one direction only. a one-way ticket.
one-year-old noun
a person or animal that is one year old.
adjective
(of a person, animal or thing) that is one year old.
all one
just the same. It's all one to me what she does.
be one up on (a person)
to have an advantage over (someone). We brought out a book on this before our rivals so we're one up on them.
not be oneself
to look or feel ill, anxious etc. I'd better go home – I'm not myself today.
one and all
all (of a group). This was agreed by one and all.
one another
used as the object of a verb when an action takes place between people etc. They hit one another.
one by one
(of a number of people, things etc) one after the other. He examined all the vases one by one.
one or two
a few. I don't want a lot of nuts – I'll just take one or two.

one of is followed by a plural noun or pronoun, but takes a singular verb: One of the girls works as a hairdresser ; One of them is ill .
References in classic literature ?
All the passengers were rubbing their eyes, comparing watches, and congratulating one another on the prospect of arriving so seasonably at the journey's end.
Things are said to be opposed in four senses: (i) as correlatives to one another, (ii) as contraries to one another, (iii) as privatives to positives, (iv) as affirmatives to negatives.
The young man whose presence served to set in play all these feminine self- conceits, appeared to pay very little heed to the matter, and, while these pretty damsels were vying with one another to attract his attention, he seemed to be chiefly absorbed in polishing the buckle of his sword belt with his doeskin glove.