onerous


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on·er·ous

 (ŏn′ər-əs, ō′nər-)
adj.
1. Troublesome or oppressive; burdensome. See Synonyms at burdensome.
2. Law Entailing more liabilities than benefits or imposing significant obligations.

[Middle English, from Old French onereus, from Latin onerōsus, from onus, oner-, burden.]

on′er·ous·ly adv.
on′er·ous·ness n.

onerous

(ˈɒnərəs; ˈəʊ-)
adj
1. laborious or oppressive
2. (Law) law (of a contract, lease, etc) having or involving burdens or obligations that counterbalance or outweigh the advantages
[C14: from Latin onerōsus burdensome, from onus load]
ˈonerously adv
ˈonerousness n

on•er•ous

(ˈɒn ər əs, ˈoʊ nər-)

adj.
1. burdensome, oppressive, or troublesome: onerous duties.
2. having or involving obligations or responsibilities, esp. legal ones, that outweigh the advantages: an onerous agreement.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin onerōsus=oner- (s. of onus) burden + -ōsus -ous]
on′er•ous•ly, adv.
on′er•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.onerous - not easily borne; wearing; "the burdensome task of preparing the income tax return"; "my duties weren't onerous; I only had to greet the guests"; "a taxing schedule"
heavy - marked by great psychological weight; weighted down especially with sadness or troubles or weariness; "a heavy heart"; "a heavy schedule"; "heavy news"; "a heavy silence"; "heavy eyelids"

onerous

adjective trying, hard, taxing, demanding, difficult, heavy, responsible, grave, crushing, exhausting, exacting, formidable, troublesome, oppressive, weighty, laborious, burdensome, irksome, backbreaking, exigent parents who have had the onerous task of bringing up a difficult child
light, easy, simple, trifling, effortless, painless, facile, undemanding, cushy (informal), untaxing, unexacting

onerous

adjective
Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength:
Translations
شاق، صَعْبُ الإحْتِمال
besværligtung
òungbær, erfiîur
apgrūtinošsnepatīkams
güçkülfetli

onerous

[ˈɒnərəs] ADJ [debt] → oneroso; [task, duty] → pesado

onerous

[ˈəʊnərəs] adj
[task, duty] → pénible
[responsibility] → lourd(e)

onerous

adj responsibilityschwer(wiegend); task, dutybeschwerlich, schwer

onerous

[ˈɒnərəs] (frm) adj (task, duty) → oneroso/a; (responsibility) → pesante

onerous

(ˈounərəs) adjective
hard to bear or do. an onerous task.

onerous

a. oneroso-a, gravoso-a.
References in classic literature ?
That all this might not be too onerous on the purses of his rustic patrons, who are apt to considered the costs of schooling a grievous burden, and schoolmasters as mere drones he had various ways of rendering himself both useful and agreeable.
The duke embraced Sancho and told him he was heartily sorry he had given up the government so soon, but that he would see that he was provided with some other post on his estate less onerous and more profitable.
After several pipes had been filled and emptied in this solemn ceremonial, the chief addressed the bride, detailing at considerable length the duties of a wife which, among Indians, are little less onerous than those of the pack-horse; this done, he turned to her friends and congratulated them upon the great alliance she had made.
Night was my usual time for correcting devoirs, and my own room the usual scene of such task--task most onerous hitherto; and it seemed strange to me to feel rising within me an incipient sense of interest, as I snuffed the candle and addressed myself to the perusal of the poor teacher's manuscript.
I was enabled to discharge the onerous duties of this profession, only by that rigid adherence to system which formed the leading feature of my mind.
By the way, your instructions to me never to allow Sir Henry to go out alone will become very much more onerous if a love affair were to be added to our other difficulties.
Having at last taken her course Tess was less restless and abstracted, going about her business with some self-assurance in the thought of acquiring another horse for her father by an occupation which would not be onerous.
It is a very onerous business, this of being served, and the debtor naturally wishes to give you a slap.
Another thing she did, and which made traveling an onerous trial for her.
And Boris, having apparently relieved himself of an onerous duty and extricated himself from an awkward situation and placed another in it, became quite pleasant again.
There being only five prisoners at Loewestein, the post of turnkey was not a very onerous one, but rather a sort of sinecure, given after a long period of service.
You will pardon me, I am sure"--here he became singularly persuasive--"but I have ventured to nail that pigtail fast, and have assumed the somewhat onerous obligation of guarding it.