onomastics


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Related to onomastics: Onomastician

on·o·mas·tics

 (ŏn′ə-măs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1.
a. The study of the origins and forms of proper names.
b. The study of the origins and forms of terms used in specialized fields.
2. The system that underlies the formation and use of proper names or terms used in specialized fields.

onomastics

(ˌɒnəˈmæstɪks)
n
1. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the study of proper names, esp of their origins
2. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular or plural) a systematization of the facts about how proper names are formed in a given language

on•o•mas•tics

(ˌɒn əˈmæs tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the origin, history, and use of proper names.
[1930–35]

onomastics

onomatology. — onomastician, n. — onomastic, adj.
See also: Names
the study of names and their origins. — onomastic, adj. — onomastician, n.
See also: Linguistics

onomastics

The study of the history, forms, and origins of proper nouns.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.onomastics - the branch of lexicology that studies the forms and origins of proper names
lexicology - the branch of linguistics that studies the lexical component of language
Translations

onomastics

[ˌɒnəʊˈmæstɪks] NSINGonomástica f
References in periodicals archive ?
Ashley, and I direct attention to the introduction to that volume for particulars on Read's contribution to onomastics.
Two such examples of Mabanckou's playful onomastics are the name of Gregoire's shantytown, "Celui-qui-boit-de-l'eau-est-un-idot," and the local road in the red-light district, "rue Cent-francs-seulement.
Because queen Medb, the Intoxicating One, appears in other tales as the embodiment of sovereignty; because Donn happens to be the name of the well-known Irish god of the dead; because there is a mighty battle and a bull fight at the end suggestive respectively of the wars of the gods and the cyclical struggles of agricultural divinities found in other Indo-European traditions; and for many more reasons serious and silly, the Tain has been enthusiastically chewed over for more than a century by scholars of mythology, oral literature, linguistics, onomastics, womens studies, and you name it.
The initial pilot phase, the National Placenames Project (1998-99), involved the employment of a full-time research fellow, Flavia Hodges, with extensive experience in the fields of onomastics, lexicography, and publishing management, to develop the methodologies and management structures needed to underpin the Survey as a whole.
Literature in Greek, Syriac, and Arabic, together with inscriptions and geographical onomastics, contribute to assessing the spread of a growing form of piety.
8) and, finally, with onomastics, archaeology and genetics (Ch.
Key-words: Language and culture, Anatolian dialects, Onomastics, Turkish person names, Turkish women's names.
See: Moses Rischin, "Toward the Onomastics of the Great New York Ghetto: How the Lower East Side Got its Name," in Diner, Shandler, and Wenger (eds.
The chapters that follow deal with vocabulary, syntax, onomastics, phonology, English grammar and usage and, finally, literary language.
It leads them to a description of the formal study of names, called onomastics, which they describe as ``an ungainly word, with irrelevant echoes of mastectomy, mastication, masturbation and the paving material called mastic.
Biological reproduction and female fertility is transformed into the esoteric and masculine domains of onomastics, mystical knowledge, ritual and politics.
In each the chapter on onomastics by Cecily Clark, who sadly did not live to see publication, is particularly useful, giving a clear and instructive summary of the wealth of material available otherwise only piecemeal.