onomatopoeia


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on·o·mat·o·poe·ia

 (ŏn′ə-măt′ə-pē′ə, -mä′tə-)
n.
The formation or use of words such as buzz or murmur that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to.

[Late Latin, from Greek onomatopoiiā, from onomatopoios, coiner of names : onoma, onomat-, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots + poiein, to make; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

on′o·mat′o·poe′ic, on′o·mat′o·po·et′ic (-pō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.
on′o·mat′o·poe′i·cal·ly, on′o·mat′o·po·et′i·cal·ly adv.

onomatopoeia

(ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the formation of words whose sound is imitative of the sound of the noise or action designated, such as hiss, buzz, and bang
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of such words for poetic or rhetorical effect. Also called (less common): onomatopoesis or onomatopoiesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek onoma name + poiein to make]
ˌonoˌmatoˈpoeic, onomatopoetic adj
ˌonoˌmatoˈpoeically, ˌonoˌmatopoˈetically adv

on•o•mat•o•poe•ia

(ˌɒn əˌmæt əˈpi ə, -ˌmɑ tə-)

n.
1. the formation of a word, as cuckoo or boom, by imitation of a sound made by or associated with its referent.
2. the use of such imitative words.
[1570–80; < Late Latin < Greek onomatopoiía making of words]
on`o•mat`o•poe′ic, on`o•mat`o•po•et′ic (-poʊˈɛt ɪk) adj.
on`o•mat`o•poe′i•cal•ly, on`o•mat`o•po•et′i•cal•ly, adv.

onomatopoeia

the state or condition of a word formed to imitate the sound of its intended meaning, as rustle. — onomatopoeic, onomatopoetic, onoma-topoietic, onomatopoeial, adj.
See also: Sound

onomatopoeia

1. The use or formation of words whose sound is intended to imitate the action or sound they mean, such as bang” or ”splash.”
2. Use of words which sound like the thing described.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.onomatopoeia - using words that imitate the sound they denote
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)

onomatopoeia

noun
The formation of words in imitation of sounds:
Translations
lydordonomatopoietikon
klanknabootsingonomatopee
onomatopeja
onomatopéia
onomatopee
onomatopoesi

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəʊmætəʊˈpiːə] Nonomatopeya f

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəmætəˈpiːə] nonomatopée f

onomatopoeia

nLautmalerei f, → Onomatopöie f (spec)

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəʊmætəʊˈpiːə] nonomatopea
References in classic literature ?
If the sound of the words actually imitates the sound of the thing indicated, the effect is called Onomatopoeia.
Imagine such a language, sprinkled with onomatopoeia.
As part of the Wickerpark off-festival program, the camping area will host a music program including Onomatopoeia, Jebebara Unity Drum, Vladimir Martin Tchekovy Moravsky, Raya Sfeir, Christophe Corm, Rhea Sharabati, and DJ sets by Ziad Nawfal.
When North African Jews began immigrating to Israel, they brought with them the hearty dish (whose name is said to be an onomatopoeia meaning "all mixed up").
Other major sound patterns of classical Arabic verse rooted in the linguistic sounds of the Arabic language, and their influence on the meaning of poetic texts, are investigated in chapter four, including onomatopoeia, parallelism, paronomasia, word-play, and other forms of sound effects.
So the onomatopoeia dyorhom opening the chapter is like a red flag right at the beginning of the text: I am making it my own text, but new, yet familiar, for my target audience.
Children will especially enjoy sounding out the onomatopoeia in the singsong lyrics.
Except buzz, and other onomatopoeia," her dad chimed in.
The lesson was followed up with some written work including the use of adjectives and onomatopoeia to support the topic and encourage the children to reflect upon the recreation of a famous event in history.
PSM Gallery (Berlin) featured an interactive installation by Nadira Husain titled Fragments and Repetition: Onomatopoeia.
Rowling exhibits an amazing talent for onomatopoeia and metaphor when she makes up names.
Young train fanatics will love the vivid colors and onomatopoeia of each scene (the HISS of steam) and the skillfully painted watercolors and highly detailed depictions of railway history, from pictures of laborers to passengers and landscapes.