onomatopoeia


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on·o·mat·o·poe·ia

 (ŏn′ə-măt′ə-pē′ə, -mä′tə-)
n.
The formation or use of words such as buzz or murmur that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to.

[Late Latin, from Greek onomatopoiiā, from onomatopoios, coiner of names : onoma, onomat-, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots + poiein, to make; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

on′o·mat′o·poe′ic, on′o·mat′o·po·et′ic (-pō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.
on′o·mat′o·poe′i·cal·ly, on′o·mat′o·po·et′i·cal·ly adv.

onomatopoeia

(ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the formation of words whose sound is imitative of the sound of the noise or action designated, such as hiss, buzz, and bang
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of such words for poetic or rhetorical effect. Also called (less common): onomatopoesis or onomatopoiesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek onoma name + poiein to make]
ˌonoˌmatoˈpoeic, onomatopoetic adj
ˌonoˌmatoˈpoeically, ˌonoˌmatopoˈetically adv

on•o•mat•o•poe•ia

(ˌɒn əˌmæt əˈpi ə, -ˌmɑ tə-)

n.
1. the formation of a word, as cuckoo or boom, by imitation of a sound made by or associated with its referent.
2. the use of such imitative words.
[1570–80; < Late Latin < Greek onomatopoiía making of words]
on`o•mat`o•poe′ic, on`o•mat`o•po•et′ic (-poʊˈɛt ɪk) adj.
on`o•mat`o•poe′i•cal•ly, on`o•mat`o•po•et′i•cal•ly, adv.

onomatopoeia

the state or condition of a word formed to imitate the sound of its intended meaning, as rustle. — onomatopoeic, onomatopoetic, onoma-topoietic, onomatopoeial, adj.
See also: Sound

onomatopoeia

1. The use or formation of words whose sound is intended to imitate the action or sound they mean, such as bang” or ”splash.”
2. Use of words which sound like the thing described.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.onomatopoeia - using words that imitate the sound they denote
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)

onomatopoeia

noun
The formation of words in imitation of sounds:
Translations
lydordonomatopoietikon
klanknabootsingonomatopee
onomatopeja
onomatopéia
onomatopee
onomatopoesi

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəʊmætəʊˈpiːə] Nonomatopeya f

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəmætəˈpiːə] nonomatopée f

onomatopoeia

nLautmalerei f, → Onomatopöie f (spec)

onomatopoeia

[ˌɒnəʊmætəʊˈpiːə] nonomatopea
References in classic literature ?
If the sound of the words actually imitates the sound of the thing indicated, the effect is called Onomatopoeia.
Author Judy Sierra amps up the madcap fun with a palindrome family reunion and an onomatopoeia marching band.
I sang songs to him that spoke of raindrops and used onomatopoeia to ensure that he remembered the songs.
Summary: A barely audible "Hi" escaped the lips of the timid young woman on stage, as she faced the crowd packed tightly into cafe and cultural space Onomatopoeia.
However, the intriguing characteristics for many of the epics are the synthetic lyricism and they resemble many other Futurist features such as analogy, onomatopoeia, and irony.
Onomatopoeia is employed to great effect, and Ballerini layers the sounds of footfalls and distant noises well.
Having a conversation with Tanae about onomatopoeia and sharing some books with him that included examples of onomatopoeia provided him with information about how and why authors use this device.
Among their topics are the changing role of manga and anime magazines in the Japanese animation industry, from victim to kira: death note and the misplaced agencies of cosmic justice, writing another's tongue: orthographic representations of non-fluency in Japanese manga, factors influencing non-native readers' sequencing of Japanese manga panels, and the sound of silence: translating onomatopoeia and mimesis in Japanese manga.
This book offers attractive pictures to explore and language that, without overdoing it, uses poetic patterns of sound such as, alliteration, onomatopoeia and rhyme.
According to Dr Rennie, children use Dahl's word in their own writing and he had a way of using onomatopoeia to make children be able to work out what the word meant.
They included representatives from HBO, who made Rome, Deadwood and The Wire; Media Rights Capital who made Ted and Fast 7; Gaumont International Television who made Narcos and Hannibal; Broad Green Pictures who made Bad Santa 2 and Robert Redford's A Walk in the Woods; Dynamic Television, makers of Z Nation and the Conan O'Brien Show and Universal The BFC's great promote international Sam Auguste, Onomatopoeia Cable Production who make Monk and Suits.
Aperghis pursues a universal language where text is unimportant and words make way for onomatopoeia, phonemes and noise.