onyx

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on·yx

 (ŏn′ĭks)
n.
A chalcedony that occurs in bands of different colors and is used as a gemstone, especially in cameos and intaglios.

[Middle English onix, from Old French, from Latin onyx, from Greek onux, nail, onyx; see nogh- in Indo-European roots.]

onyx

(ˈɒnɪks)
n
1. (Minerals) a variety of chalcedony with alternating black and white parallel bands, used as a gemstone. Formula: SiO2
2. (Minerals) a compact variety of calcite used as an ornamental stone; onyx marble. Formula: CaCO3
[C13: from Latin from Greek: fingernail (so called from its veined appearance)]

on•yx

(ˈɒn ɪks, ˈoʊ nɪks)

n.
1. a variety of chalcedony having straight parallel bands of alternating colors.
2. (not in technical use) an unbanded chalcedony dyed for ornamental purposes.
3. black, esp. a pure or jet black.
adj.
4. black, esp. jet black.
[1250–1300; Middle English onix < Latin onyx < Greek ónyx nail, claw, veined gem]

on·yx

(ŏn′ĭks)
A type of quartz that occurs in bands of different colors, often black and white.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.onyx - a chalcedony with alternating black and white bandsonyx - a chalcedony with alternating black and white bands; used in making cameos
calcedony, chalcedony - a milky or greyish translucent to transparent quartz
sardonyx - an onyx characterized by parallel layers of sard and a different colored mineral

onyx

adjective
Of the darkest achromatic visual value:
Translations
مَرْمَر
onyks
ónix
ónyx
oniksas
onikss
ônix
ónyxónyxový
damarlı akik

onyx

[ˈɒnɪks] Nónice m, ónix m

onyx

[ˈɒnɪks] nonyx m

onyx

nOnyx m
adjOnyx-; onyx jewellery (Brit) or jewelry (US) → Onyxschmuck m

onyx

[ˈɒnɪks] nonice f

onyx

(ˈoniks) noun
a type of precious stone with layers of different colours. The ashtray is made of onyx; (also adjective) an onyx ashtray.
References in classic literature ?
There were forty carbuncles, two hundred and ten sapphires, sixty-one agates, and a great quantity of beryls, onyxes, cats'-eyes, turquoises, and other stones, the very names of which I did not know at the time, though I have become more familiar with them since.