open adoption


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open adoption

n.
1. The policy, practice, or agreement allowing contact between an adopted child and the child's biological parents.
2. An instance of such an adoption.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within months I had published the Open Adoption Bill 2014, aimed at allowing today's adopted children to maintain contact with members of their natural family, a practice widely accepted throughout the US.
French diplomat, Jean FranA'ois Girault, said that Iran's position was very positive in this regard, but really what reflects Iran's true stance is Hezbollah's open adoption of FPM leader Michel Aoun's presidential candidacy," he added.
The research shows that an open adoption process with ongoing contact can produce positive outcomes for birth parents as well as children.
She previously fought for a new law for open adoption to become legal in Minnesota, which was successfully enacted.
Her newest book explores questions of Jewish identity when families opt for open adoption and when such families include non-Jews.
Scott Kriz, CEO Bitium, said as software moves to the cloud at a rapid pace, we are poised to continue our rapid expansion and Polaris and Dave understand the importance of an open adoption model for enterprises.
FIA is committed to open adoption, inclusiveness, and providing lifelong support to all members of the adoption circle.
Now, the family use the same methods to keep in regular contact with his mother, who lives hundreds of miles away, and maintain their open adoption policy, the report said.
Beset by anxieties about her status as a wife, as a daughter-in-law, and as an infertile cancer survivor in a culture that glamorizes pregnancy, Jesse, a New York-based teacher, turns to an open adoption agency in North Carolina that may possibly help.
Today, although some remain skeptical about the feasibility of open adoption (Brown, Ryan, & Pushkal, 2008), adoptions in which biological and adoptive parents exchange identifying information and have some form of contact with each other are the norm (Vandivere, Maim, & Radel, 2009).