open air


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open air

n
a. the place or space where the air is unenclosed; the outdoors
b. (as modifier): an open-air concert.

o′pen air′


n.
the outdoors.
[1520–30]
o′pen-air′, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.open air - where the air is unconfinedopen air - where the air is unconfined; "he wanted to get outdoors a little"; "the concert was held in the open air"; "camping in the open"
exterior, outside - the region that is outside of something
References in classic literature ?
Till the animals that have entered your cave come out again I prefer to remain in the open air.
Now it happened one day that the King of the land held a hunt in this wood, and saw the Snow-daughter wandering about in the open air.
When Aramis had seen to all these things, and appeared satisfied with the result of his inspection, "Let us consult Porthos," said he, "to know if we must endeavor to get the boat out by the unknown extremity of the grotto, following the descent and the shade of the cavern, or whether it be better, in the open air, to make it slide upon its rollers through the bushes, leveling the road of the little beach, which is but twenty feet high, and gives, at high tide, three or four fathoms of good water upon a sound bottom.
Let your worship order it so that we pass it out of doors and in the open air, and I'll scarify myself.
She flies, she is joyous, she is just born; she seeks the spring, the open air, liberty: oh, yes
Nor indeed can the whale possibly be otherwise than fragrant, when, as a general thing, he enjoys such high health; taking abundance of exercise; always out of doors; though, it is true, seldom in the open air.
The foreign seamen in the Nautilus were contented with the air that circulated in the interior; none of them had come to drink in the open air.
Edna still felt dazed when she got outside in the open air.
At this dim inceptive stage of the day Tess seemed to Clare to exhibit a dignified largeness both of disposition and physique, an almost regnant power, possibly because he knew that at that preternatural time hardly any woman so well endowed in person as she was likely to be walking in the open air within the boundaries of his horizon; very few in all England.
It was so with Ahab; only that now, of late, he seemed so much to live in the open air, that truly speaking, his visits were more to the cabin, than from, the cabin to the planks.
Next to the commonalty of husbandmen is one of shepherds and herdsmen; for they have many things in common with them, and, by their way of life, are excellently qualified to make good soldiers, stout in body, and able to continue in the open air all night.
I don't mind the dust," said Anne, "but Gilbert says I must keep in the open air.