openness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

o·pen

 (ō′pən)
adj.
1.
a. Affording unobstructed entrance and exit; not shut or closed.
b. Affording unobstructed passage or view: open waters; the open countryside.
2.
a. Having no protecting or concealing cover: an open wound; an open sports car.
b. Completely obvious; blatant: open disregard of the law.
c. Carried on in full view of others; not hidden or private: open warfare; open family strife.
d. Sports Not defended or not closely defended by an opponent: an open goal; an open receiver.
3.
a. Not sealed or tied: an open envelope.
b. Spread out; unfolded: an open book.
4. Having interspersed gaps, spaces, or intervals: open ranks; an open weave.
5.
a. Accessible to all; unrestricted as to participants: an open competition.
b. Free from limitations, boundaries, or restrictions: open registration.
c. Enterable by registered voters regardless of political affiliation: an open primary.
d. Computers Of or relating to a file that can be accessed.
6.
a. Lacking effective regulation: an open town in which gambling predominated.
b. Not legally repressed: open drug trafficking.
7.
a. Susceptible; vulnerable: open to interpretation; an issue that is open to question.
b. Willing to consider or deal with something: open to suggestions.
8.
a. Available; obtainable: The job is still open.
b. Available for use: an open account; the only course open to us.
9. Ready to transact business: The store is open.
10. Not engaged or filled: has an open hour for emergency cases.
11. Not yet decided; subject to further thought: an open question.
12.
a. Characterized by lack of secrecy or reserve; candid: Please be open with me. See Synonyms at frank1.
b. Free of prejudice; receptive to new ideas and arguments: She listened to the proposal with an open mind.
c. Generous: He is very open with his time.
13. Printing
a. Widely spaced or leaded. Used of typeset or other printed matter.
b. Having constituent elements separated by a space in writing or printing: The word sea lion is an open compound.
14. Music
a. Not stopped by a finger. Used of a string or hole of an instrument.
b. Produced by an unstopped string or hole or without the use of slides, valves, or keys: an open note on a trumpet.
c. Played without a mute: an open wind instrument.
15. Linguistics
a. Articulated with the tongue in a low position, as the vowel in far.
b. Ending in a vowel or diphthong: an open syllable.
16. Designating a method of punctuation in which commas and other marks are used sparingly.
17. Being in operation; live: an open microphone.
18. New England Clear. Used of weather. fair1
19. Electricity Containing a gap across which electricity cannot pass: an open circuit.
20. Mathematics
a. Of or relating to an interval containing neither of its endpoints.
b. Of or being a set such that at least one neighborhood of every point in the set is within the set.
c. Of or being a set that is the complement of a closed set.
21. Sports
a. Having the forward foot farther from the intended point of impact with the ball than the rear foot: an open batting stance.
b. Held or swung with the top or outer edge of the striking face pointing slightly farther away from the objective than the lower or inner edge: The club struck the ball with an open face, causing a slice.
22. Physics
a. Of or relating to an open system.
b. Of or relating to an open universe.
v. o·pened, o·pen·ing, o·pens
v.tr.
1.
a. To make no longer closed or fastened: open a window.
b. To remove obstructions from; clear: open a drain.
2.
a. To make or force an opening in: The surgeon opened the patient's chest.
b. To make (a hole or gap) in something: opened a hole in the levee.
c. To form spaces or gaps between: soldiers opening ranks.
d. To break the continuity of; make a gap in: open a circuit.
3.
a. To remove the cover, cork, or lid from: open a jar.
b. To remove the wrapping from: open a package.
4.
a. To move apart or unfold so that the inner parts are displayed; spread out: open a newspaper; open a book.
b. To part the lids or lips of: Open your eyes. Open your mouth.
5.
a. To begin or form the start of; initiate: The scene that opens the novel.
b. To begin the operation of: open a new business.
c. To begin (the action in a game of cards) by making the first bid, placing the first bet, or playing the first lead.
6. To make available for use: opened the area to commercial development; opened the computer file and retrieved some data.
7. To make more responsive, understanding, or generous: a question that opened his mind to a different way of looking at the problem.
8. To make known to the public: opened the formerly classified files to reporters.
9. Sports To modify (one's stance), as in baseball or golf, so that it is open.
10.
a. To perform as the first act of (a concert, for example): An up-and-coming rock group opened the music festival.
b. To perform prior to the main act of (a concert, for example): Two different bands opened the concert on Friday night.
v.intr.
1. To become no longer closed or fastened: The door opened slowly.
2. To draw apart; separate: The wound opened under pressure.
3. To spread apart; unfold: The tulips opened.
4. To come into view; become revealed: The plain opened before us.
5. To become responsive, understanding, or generous: His heart finally opened, and he understood her disappointment.
6.
a. To be or serve as a beginning; commence: The meeting opened with a call to order.
b. To give an initial statement in a trial.
c. To begin business or operation: The store opens early on Saturday.
d. To be performed, shown, or made available to the public for the first time: The play opens next week.
e. To be priced or listed at a specified amount when trading begins: Shares opened high and fell sharply.
f. To make a bid, bet, or lead in starting a game of cards.
7. To give access: The room opens onto a terrace.
8.
a. To perform as the first act of a multi-act performance: The singer was nervous to open for so many talented musicians.
b. To perform prior to the main act of a multi-act performance: The young comedians were thrilled to open for such a well-known standup comic.
n.
1. An unobstructed area of land or water: sailed out of the harbor into the open.
2. The outdoors: camping in the open.
3. An undisguised or unconcealed state: brought the problem out into the open.
4. A tournament or contest in which both professional and amateur players may participate.
5. A beginning: Shares were down at the market open.
Phrasal Verb:
open up
1. To spread out; unfold: A green valley opened up before us.
2. To begin operation or start (something): The new store opens up next month. The band opened up the concert with an old favorite.
3. To begin firing: The artillery opened up at dawn.
4. Informal To speak freely and candidly: At last the frightened witness opened up and told the truth.
5. To make an opening in by cutting: The surgeon opened up the patient's chest.
6. To make available or accessible: open up new markets.
7. Informal To accelerate. Used of a motor vehicle.
8. Sports To get a sudden, insurmountable lead in (an athletic contest).
Idioms:
open fire
To begin firing a gun or guns.
open (one's) eyes
To become aware of the truth of a situation.

[Middle English, from Old English; see upo in Indo-European roots.]

o′pen·ly adv.
o′pen·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.openness - without obstructions to passage or view; "the openness of the prairies"
spatial arrangement, spacing - the property possessed by an array of things that have space between them
patency - the openness (lack of obstruction) of a bodily passage or duct
2.openness - characterized by an attitude of ready accessibility (especially about one's actions or purposes); without concealment; not secretive
sociability, sociableness - the relative tendency or disposition to be sociable or associate with one's fellows
secretiveness, closeness - characterized by a lack of openness (especially about one's actions or purposes)
3.openness - willingness or readiness to receive (especially impressions or ideas); "he was testing the government's receptiveness to reform"; "this receptiveness is the key feature in oestral behavior, enabling natural mating to occur"; "their receptivity to the proposal"
willingness - cheerful compliance; "he expressed his willingness to help"

openness

noun frankness, honesty, truthfulness, naturalness, bluntness, forthrightness, ingenuousness, artlessness, guilelessness, candidness, freeness, open-heartedness, absence of reserve, candour or (U.S.) candor, sincerity or sincereness, unreservedness a relationship based on openness and trust
Quotations
"I will wear my heart upon my sleeve" [William Shakespeare Othello]

openness

noun
1. The condition of being laid open to something undesirable or injurious:
2. Ready acceptance of often new suggestions, ideas, influences, or opinions:
Translations

openness

[ˈəʊpnnɪs] N (= frankness) → franqueza f

openness

[ˈəʊpənnɪs] n
(= frankness) → franchise f
(= receptivity) → ouverture f
openness to sth → ouverture à qch
her openness to new ideas → son ouverture aux nouvelles idéesopen-plan [ˌəʊpənˈplæn] adj [building, room] → sans cloison; [office] → paysagé(e)open primary n (US) élection primaire ouverte aux non-inscrits d'un partiopen prison nprison f ouverteopen question n
it is an open question whether ... → la question reste ouverte de savoir si ...open sandwich ntartine fopen season n (when usual restrictions are lifted or ignored)chasse f ouverte
open season on sb → la chasse ouverte à qn
to declare open season on sb → déclarer la chasse ouverte à qnopen secret nsecret m de Polichinelle
it's an open secret that ... → ce n'est un secret pour personne que ...open shop n (= company) entreprise qui admet les travailleurs non syndiquésopen ticket nbillet m openOpen University n (British) the Open University centre d'enseignement universitaire par correspondanceopen verdict nverdict m constatant un décès sans cause déterminée

openness

n
(= frankness)Offenheit f, → Aufrichtigkeit f; (= publicness)Öffentlichkeit f, → Offenheit f
(fig: of mind) → Aufgeschlossenheit f(to für)
(of countryside, coast)Offenheit f
(= looseness: of weave) → Lockerheit f

openness

[ˈəʊpnnɪs] n (frankness) → franchezza, sincerità
References in classic literature ?
Now, the remarkable point is, that the original wears, to the world's eye,--and, for aught I know, to his most intimate friends,--an exceedingly pleasant countenance, indicative of benevolence, openness of heart, sunny good-humor, and other praiseworthy qualities of that cast.
There is an openness, a quickness, almost a bluntness in Mr.
His want of spirits, of openness, and of consistency, were most usually attributed to his want of independence, and his better knowledge of Mrs.
It might be that the unalluring secrecy and reserve of one sister, the all-attractive openness and high spirits of the other, were more or less referable, in each case, to those physical causes which work toward the production of moral results.
He had no good-humour in his face, nor any openness of aspect left, but had become a secret, angry, dangerous man.
But as this tract is put forth merely as a history, or, if you will, as a tale, in which, amid some examples worthy of imitation, there will be found, perhaps, as many more which it were advisable not to follow, I hope it will prove useful to some without being hurtful to any, and that my openness will find some favor with all.
Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied.
Poyser, with her keenness and abundant opportunity for observation, should have formed a tolerably fair estimate of what might be expected from Hetty in the way of feeling, and in moments of indignation she had sometimes spoken with great openness on the subject to her husband.
I should not have mentioned the subject, though very anxious to know her sentiments; but I had not been in the room five minutes before she began introducing it with all that openness of heart, and sweet peculiarity of manner, that spirit and ingenuousness which are so much a part of herself.
Otherwise, is it likely that she, the cautious and clever woman that she was, would have indulged in this familiarity and openness with me?
The latter pursuit, however, Aylmer had long laid aside in unwilling recognition of the truth--against which all seekers sooner or later stumble--that our great creative Mother, while she amuses us with apparently working in the broadest sunshine, is yet severely careful to keep her own secrets, and, in spite of her pretended openness, shows us nothing but results.
Anne thought she left great happiness behind her when they quitted the house; and Louisa, by whom she found herself walking, burst forth into raptures of admiration and delight on the character of the navy; their friendliness, their brotherliness, their openness, their uprightness; protesting that she was convinced of sailors having more worth and warmth than any other set of men in England; that they only knew how to live, and they only deserved to be respected and loved.