operagoing

operagoing

(ˈɒpərəˌɡəʊɪŋ)
n
the action of going to operas
References in periodicals archive ?
And composer Ash has cleverly built in subtle goodies intended for the operagoing adults.
Ketterer demonstrates that "Rome provided early modern Europe with impressive visual and aural presentations of two important myths, which I call the myth of the clement prince and the myth of liberty" (2), because these myths reflected central preoccupations of educated, operagoing audiences during the period before and up to shortly after the French Revolution.
Discussing the Verfremdungseffekt (she prudently chooses "estrangement effect" from among the various attempts to render the concept in English) in her last chapter with regard to recent operatic productions, she argues that "estrangement has its roots in Brecht's own operagoing experience" (p.
Their disapproval came at an unusually sensitive and heated time, as Berlin's operagoing establishment was rocked by an uproar over the cancellation of Hans Neuenfels's controversial staging of the Mozart opera Idomeneo for fear of offending Muslims and courting Islamist attacks.
We have then to reckon with a habit of operagoing that is amply demonstrated by the mass of Stendhal's occasional writing on the form, from the Vie de Rossini to the less well-known L'Opera italien: notes d' un dilettante, a collection of enthusiastic reviews and considerations of the state of opera in Paris from 1824 to 1827.
On the other hand, the Ada I saw last summer was not only the worst production of Verdi's great opera I have seen in some forty years of operagoing but the worst production of any opera I have ever seen, period.
The popular papers, fighting each other for circulation, were quick to point out that the operagoing rich would benefit from poor people's lottery stakes.
See Carole Taylor, "Italian Operagoing in London, 1700-1745" (Ph.
Even looking back at my rather extensive career of operagoing, the art form never has seemed so much a gay thing as a kid thing.
4 [2001]: 877-79), Rosamund Bartlett, author of Wagner and Russia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), disputes the definition of the 1840s to 1880s as the "Golden Age" of operagoing in Russia, when it should really be characterized more narrowly as Russia's "golden age for the Italian opera" (p.