opponent

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op·po·nent

 (ə-pō′nənt)
n.
1. One that opposes another or others, as in a battle, contest, or debate: a political opponent.
2. One who is hostile to an idea or cause: an opponent of gun control.
adj.
Acting against an antagonist or opposing force: opponent armies.

[Latin oppōnēns, oppōnent-, present participle of oppōnere, to oppose; see oppose.]

op·po′nen·cy n.

opponent

(əˈpəʊnənt)
n
1. a person who opposes another in a contest, battle, etc
2. (Anatomy) anatomy an opponent muscle
adj
3. opposite, as in position
4. (Anatomy) anatomy (of a muscle) bringing two parts into opposition
5. opposing; contrary
[C16: from Latin oppōnere to oppose, from ob- against + pōnere to place]
opˈponency n

op•po•nent

(əˈpoʊ nənt)

n.
1. a person who is on an opposing side in a game, controversy, or the like; adversary.
adj.
2. being opposite, as in position.
3. opposing; adverse; antagonistic.
4. Anat. bringing parts together or into opposition, as a muscle.
[1580–90; < Latin oppōnent-, s. of oppōnēns, present participle of oppōnere to place over, against]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opponent - a contestant that you are matched againstopponent - a contestant that you are matched against
contestant - a person who participates in competitions
2.opponent - someone who offers oppositionopponent - someone who offers opposition  
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
dueler, duelist, dueller, duellist - a person who fights duels
foe, foeman, enemy, opposition - an armed adversary (especially a member of an opposing military force); "a soldier must be prepared to kill his enemies"
Luddite - any opponent of technological progress
withstander - an opponent who resists with force or resolution; "obstinate withstanders of innovation"
Adj.1.opponent - characterized by active hostility; "opponent (or opposing) armies"
hostile - characterized by enmity or ill will; "a hostile nation"; "a hostile remark"; "hostile actions"

opponent

noun
1. adversary, rival, enemy, the opposition, competitor, challenger, foe, contestant, antagonist Mr Kennedy's opponent in the leadership contest
adversary friend, ally, colleague, associate, supporter, mate, helper, accomplice, main man (slang, chiefly U.S.), cobber (Austral. or old-fashioned N.Z. informal)
2. opposer, dissident, objector, dissentient, disputant He became an outspoken opponent of the old Soviet system.
opposer supporter

opponent

noun
1. One that opposes another in a battle, contest, controversy, or debate:
Translations
protivník
modstander
vastustaja
protivnik
mótherji, andstæîingur
敵対者
대항자
oponentas
oponentspretinieks
nasprotnik
motståndare
ฝ่ายตรงข้าม
đối thủ

opponent

[əˈpəʊnənt] Nadversario/a m/f, contrincante mf; (in debate, discussion) → oponente mf, adversario/a m/f

opponent

[əˈpəʊnənt] n
(in match, contest)adversaire m/f
Mr Kennedy's opponent in the leadership contest → l'adversaire de M. Kennedy dans la lutte pour le leadership
(political)opposant(e) m/f
his political opponents → ses opposants politiques
[idea, policy] → adversaire m/f

opponent

nGegner(in) m(f); (in debate, battle of wits etc also) → Opponent m

opponent

[əˈpəʊnənt] navversario/a; (in debate, discussion) → oppositore/trice
I have always been an opponent of privatization → sono sempre stato un accanito oppositore delle privatizzazioni

opponent

(əˈpəunənt) noun
a person who opposes. an opponent of the government; He beat his opponent by four points.
opporˈtune adjective
coming at the right time. an opportune remark.
opporˈtunely adverb
opporˈtuneness noun
opportunism noun
opporˈtunist noun
a person who takes advantage of any circumstance which will help him personally. a political opportunist.

opponent

خَصّمٌ protivník modstander Gegner αντίπαλος adversario vastustaja opposant protivnik avversario 敵対者 대항자 tegenstander motstander przeciwnik adversário оппонент motståndare ฝ่ายตรงข้าม karşıt đối thủ 对手

opponent

n. oponente, antagonista, contrario-a;
a. opuesto-a, contrario-a.
References in classic literature ?
The weapons were instantly placed in the hands of the friendly opponents, and they were bid to fire, over the heads of the seated multitude, at an earthen vessel, which lay, by accident, on a stump, some fifty yards from the place where they stood.
Practically speaking, the opponents to a reform in Massachusetts are not a hundred thousand politicians at the South, but a hundred thousand merchants and farmers here, who are more interested in commerce and agriculture than they are in humanity, and are not prepared to do justice to the slave and to Mexico, cost what it may.
I find that socialism is often misunderstood by its least intelligent supporters and opponents to mean simply unrestrained indulgence of our natural propensity to heave bricks at respectable persons.
It expected an easy victory; in fact, the disparity between the two opponents was so evident, that there seemed little chance of a contest of any kind.
I will ask you then to assume with me, as I was saying, that my opponents are of two kinds; one recent, the other ancient: and I hope that you will see the propriety of my answering the latter first, for these accusations you heard long before the others, and much oftener.
They had furious contests with England for the dominion of the sea, and were among the most persevering and most implacable of the opponents of Louis XIV.
It would be pronounced by the very men who had been agents in, or opponents of, the measures to which the decision would relate.
Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as Communistic by its opponents in power?
My blade was swinging with the rapidity of lightning as I sought to parry the thrusts and cuts of my opponents.
He is a colleague of the count, and one of the most active opponents to the idea of providing the Chamber of Peers with a uniform.
This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.
It must not be forgotten that this was the first time when Nelson, commanding in chief, had his opponents under way - the first time and the last.