oppressively


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op·pres·sive

 (ə-prĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Exercising power arbitrarily and often unjustly; tyrannical.
2. Difficult to cope with; causing hardship or depressed spirits: oppressive demands. See Synonyms at burdensome.
3. Hot and humid; sweltering: an oppressive heat wave.

op·pres′sive·ly adv.
op·pres′sive·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.oppressively - in a heavy and oppressive way; "it was oppressively hot in the office"
Translations
nyomasztóan
á kúgandi hátt
zulümle

oppressively

[əˈpresɪvlɪ] ADV
1. (= unjustly) [rule, govern] → de manera opresiva, de modo opresivo
2. (= stiflingly) the room was oppressively hoten la habitación hacía un calor sofocante or agobiante
it was oppressively humidhacía una humedad agobiante
the city is oppressively drab and greyla ciudad es tan monótona y gris que resulta opresiva or agobiante

oppressively

adv
rulerepressiv; to tax oppressivelydrückende Steuern plerheben
(fig) hotdrückend; oppressively drab and greybedrückend grau in grau

oppressively

[əˈprɛsɪvlɪ] adv (see adj) → oppressivamente, in modo opprimente
it was oppressively hot → faceva un caldo opprimente

oppress

(əˈpres) verb
1. to govern cruelly. The king oppressed his people.
2. to worry or depress. The thought of leaving her oppressed me.
opˈpression (-ʃən) noun
After five years of oppression, the peasants revolted.
opˈpressive (-siv) adjective
oppressing; cruel; hard to bear. oppressive laws.
opˈpressively adverb
opˈpressiveness noun
opˈpressor noun
a ruler who oppresses his people; a tyrant.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes when he came he was silent and moody, and after a few sarcastic remarks went away again, to tramp the streets of Lincoln, which were almost as quiet and oppressively domestic as those of Black Hawk.
The morning was oppressively hot, and she threw up the lower sash to admit more air into the room, as Mr.
She had found him a pleasant companion, light-hearted, fond of music and fun, polite and considerate, appreciative of her talents, quick-witted without being oppressively clever, and, as a married man, disinterested in his attentions.
The sage Cide Hamete Benengeli relates that as soon as Don Quixote took leave of his hosts and all who had been present at the burial of Chrysostom, he and his squire passed into the same wood which they had seen the shepherdess Marcela enter, and after having wandered for more than two hours in all directions in search of her without finding her, they came to a halt in a glade covered with tender grass, beside which ran a pleasant cool stream that invited and compelled them to pass there the hours of the noontide heat, which by this time was beginning to come on oppressively.
During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.
Bennet had been downstairs; but on this happy day she again took her seat at the head of her table, and in spirits oppressively high.
The weather, too, which had recently been frosty, was now oppressively warm, and there was a great scarcity of water, insomuch that a valuable dog belonging to Mr.
The atmosphere felt oppressively close, and was tainted with gaseous odors which had been tormented forth by the processes of science.
On entering his room I found Holmes in animated conversation with two men, one of whom I recognised as Peter Jones, the official police agent, while the other was a long, thin, sad-faced man, with a very shiny hat and oppressively respectable frock-coat.
She had grown tired of what people called "society"; New York was kind, it was almost oppressively hospitable; she should never forget the way in which it had welcomed her back; but after the first flush of novelty she had found herself, as she phrased it, too "different" to care for the things it cared about--and so she had decided to try Washington, where one was supposed to meet more varieties of people and of opinion.
And her picture of the minutely hierarchical constitution of the society of that city, which she presented to him in many different lights, was, to Winterbourne's imagination, almost oppressively striking.
I was left some minutes in the oppressively silent hall, shaken, startled, ashamed of my garrulity, aching to get away.